Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Conversations With Student Writers

Examine Your Practice

Learning to talk about their own writing process is a metacognitive skill students need to be taught. Read the following quote, consider your own students, and then answer the questions that follow.

It's much more useful to teach children to talk you through their process [than to just have them read their pieces] because one of the main things you're teaching in the conference is how to become articulate about their process and about the products they're creating. I want children to learn to do that. They understand much better how their draft works if they have to explain it, and the goal is to help students see themselves as writers who can do that.

— Katie Wood Ray

Notebook.

Guiding Questions

  • In a typical writing conference, how much time do you spend on average talking and how much time do you spend listening to the student?
  • Think of students who are reluctant to discuss their work. What are some possible reasons behind their reticence? What are some ways to help reluctant students become actively involved during writing conferences?

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