Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Writing.

Session Preparation

To prepare for this workshop session, you will review the key terms, identify the strategies that you already use, review the key terms, and then read two articles on effective writing instruction.

Notebook.

What Do You Do?

Writing is critical to understanding the content and concepts of the intermediate-grade curriculum. Consider the ways you ask your students to write each day to demonstrate their understanding and personal response to the curriculum. Take notes on the Writing Instruction Chart (PDF), outlining how your students write in different subject areas and what strategies you use to help students improve in each area. You may want to include an additional curriculum area. Some examples are provided. If you are taking this workshop for credit, save your chart for your Literacy Practices Portfolio.

Think about these questions before completing the chart:

  • How do you integrate reading and writing?
  • How do you connect your writing assignments with your students' experiences?
  • What challenges do your students face in completing writing tasks?
Assignment.

Examine the Literature

Print out two copies of the Examine the Literature Response Chart (PDF). Then read each article listed below, recording your ideas on the charts during and after reading. When you have finished, save your charts to submit as an assignment.

Struggling Readers Get Hooked on Writing (PDF)
In this article, Derek Furr suggests ways to support struggling writers as they write reports.

Furr, Derek. "Struggling Readers Get Hooked on Writing." The Reading Teacher 56, no. 6 (2003): 518-525.

Children's Books as Models to Teach Writing Skills (PDF)
This article describes how teachers can use children's books to model the writing skills they are teaching.

McElveen, S. A., and C. C. Dierking. "Children's Books as Models to Teach Writing Skills." The Reading Teacher 54, no. 4 (2000-2001): 362-364.

Next > Analyze the Video

Session 4: Printouts | Assignments | Resources

 

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