Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU
Primary Sources - Workshop in American History Workshop 6 - The Census: Who We Think We Arehomesitemap
Introduction -Link Before You Watch - link Lectures and Activities Classroom and Applications - Link

Workshop 6: Lectures & Activities


Activity One:
How Would You Fill Out the Census Form?

After viewing Lecture One, examine the documents. Then fill out the four different census forms, focusing on the categories of race and ethnicity. Use the questions to guide your reflection.
Link to facilitators' notes

Note: This activity has two sets of questions: those that relate to specific documents and appear on each document page and more general, "big picture" questions listed below. You may begin with general or specific questions depending upon your preference.


Consider These Questions

• 

How do census categories create identities for individuals?

• 

Do the census categories match what you feel your racial/ethnic identity is?

• 

What is the difference between an ethnic group and a race?

• 

What is the difference between a biological and a cultural identity? How do you determine which is which? Is one more powerful/important than the other?


Image of  Evelynn Hammonds

"...an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control was analyzing infant deaths, infants born from 1983 through 1985, and he found that many infants had a different race on their death certificate than they had on their birth certificate.... So researchers in epidemiology and health statistics were saying, 'We can't use these categories if people don't know how to use them in any kind of coherent and consistent way, if you're a different race when you're born than when you die.' "
— Evelynn Hammonds


  Primary Sources: Documents

(Click here for information on using primary source documents)

 

image of a generic historical documentOffice of Management and Budget Directive No. 15

This OMB document standardizes the collection of racial and ethnic information among federal agencies as required by Congress.


image of a generic historical documentAmerican Anthropological Association Response to Office of Management and Budget Directive 15

The professional organization of anthropologists responds to OMB Directive 15 and makes recommendations for changes to the 2010 Census.


image of a generic historical documentAmerican Anthropological Association Statement on "Race"

The AAA Executive Board gives an official statement of its position on "race."


image of a generic historical documentCensus Form from 1830


image of a generic historical documentCensus Form from 1890: Original Document | Printer-Friendly Version


image of a generic historical documentCensus Form from 1970: Original Document | Printer-Friendly Version


image of a generic historical documentCensus Form from 1990: Original Document | Printer-Friendly Version


image of a generic historical documentOffice of Management and Budget Bulletin 00-02

This bulletin establishes guidance for agencies that collect or use aggregate data on race.


image of a generic historical documentCensus 2000: "Race, Hispanic Origin, and Ancestry"

This document is an explanatory piece that accompanied the 2000 Census form.



Workshop 6: Introduction | Before You Watch | Lectures & Activities | Classroom Applications | Resources

Primary Sources Home | Map | About the Workshops

© Annenberg Foundation 2014. All rights reserved. Legal Policy