Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU

Making Meaning in Literature Grades 6-8
Conversations in Literature — Workshop

About Making Meaning in Literature: A Workshop for Teachers, Grades 6-8

Individual Workshop Descriptions

1. Introducing our Literary Community
2. Encouraging Discussion
3. Going Further in Discussion
4. Diversity in Texts
5. Student Diversity
6. Literature, Art, and Other Disciplines
7. Assessment
8. Planning and Professional Development
9. Starting in September...




HomeEnvisionment BuildingHelpful Hints for Site LeadersLesson BuilderSearch this SiteSite Map
Planning and Professional Development


Introduction

Key Points

Learning Objectives

Background Reading

Homework Assignment

Classroom Connection
Ongoing Activity

Additional Reading


Extension: Classroom Connection

Student Activities
Try these activities with your students:

  • Give students a list of activities and experiences they have had with literature in the past. Ask them to rate them 1-3 (1 = they learned a lot; 2 = they learned a little; and 3 = they didn't learn anything). Then ask them to rate them as "Interesting," "Okay," and "Boring." Discuss their ratings to find out what made certain activities and experiences both fruitful and interesting and what made them useless and boring. Consider their observations in your planning.
  • Ask students to write about unpleasant or uncomfortable experiences they have had with literature — either within class or elsewhere. As they share their stories, use an overhead or chart paper to list characteristics of such experiences. Consider these insights in your planning.
  • Ask students to write about good experiences they have had with literature — either within class or elsewhere. As they share their stories, use an overhead or chart paper to list characteristics of such experiences. Consider these insights in your planning.
  • Develop an evaluation tool that focuses on determining what students found most interesting and most valuable for them as learners. Ask them to complete it at the end of a unit or at the end of the year. Consider these insights in your planning.

Teacher as a Reflective Practitioner
Make a list of the classroom experiences with literature that you feel have been most successful for you and your students. For each experience, list characteristics including the kinds of activities students were engaged in (e.g., writing, whole-class discussion, small-group discussion, oral performance, etc.), ways in which students demonstrated their engagement and learning, and ways in which you knew it was successful. Use the Teacher Resource "Four Principles of Envisionment-Building Classrooms" to chart each experience. How can you use your analysis to develop additional successful experiences? (See the Appendix in the Support Materials.)

 previous   next 




© Annenberg Foundation 2014. All rights reserved. Legal Policy