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In Search of the Novel:Teacher-TalkNovel

Subject: Re: Frankenstein--for what ability & Avoiding Plagiarism

From: gcor (gcor@jersey.net)
Date: Fri Mar 24 2000 - 10:09:12 EST


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This is a good question. I, too, am interested in this DRP reading
index, and how it is determined. When I taught Frankenstein last
semester to students that have minimal experience with reading, I
noticed the number of archaic words in the text. I made lists of these
words from each chapter, the students made lists of words, too, that
they found difficult to understand, and defined them, and then created
voacabulary collages to begin to show what they had learned about words
and their connections to images today. They explained the collages to
other class members.

Aside from the vocabulary, the students had difficulty understanding the
shifting point of view of the story. Remember now these students in
their first year at college had little exposure to reading classics in
high school and theygenerally dislike reading for pleasure. I remember
the day we discussed how the story started to be told by the Creature
rather than by Frankenstein. Students could not believe that a novel
could shift perspective; also, they held a strong media image of the
monster and the name Frankenstein, so it was difficult for them to break
this connection. Also, studdents told me that they had never read a
story for symbolic meaning. These students had not taken AP courses in
high school and had minimal exposure to reading a book closely by asking
questions about its author's life, by connecting questions about life to
the events in the plot, or by beginningto question the historical
context for the book.

I think this book could provide a fantastic framework for an
interdisciplinary class of history, political science, philosophy,
science, and literature. The book is complicated but very exciting.

To avoid plagiarism, I had them engage in a six week "I-Search" paper
project related to the novel, they completed study-guide questions that
I created, they designed vocabulary collages for words that they
identified as hard to understand, they completed questions that they
answered in realtion to the inquiry that they were following. At the
end of thie six weeks, students discussed what they learned through this
process of asking a question about the novel.

Truly,
Gail

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dr. Gail S. Corso
Associate Professor of Communication Arts
Coordinator of Writing
Neumann College
Aston, PA 19014-1298

gcorso@neumann.edu
610-558-5515

Julia Shugert wrote:

> How do you determine DRP (Degrees of Reading Power)?

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This is a good question. I, too, am interested in this DRP reading index,
and how it is determined.&nbsp;&nbsp; When I taught <i>Frankenstein</i>
last semester to students that have minimal experience with reading, I
noticed the number of archaic words in the text.&nbsp;&nbsp; I made lists
of these words from each chapter, the students made lists of words, too,&nbsp;
that they found difficult to understand, and defined them, and then created
voacabulary collages to begin to show what they had learned about words
and their connections to images today.&nbsp; They explained the collages
to other class members.
<p>Aside from the vocabulary, the students had difficulty understanding
the shifting point of view of the story. Remember now these students in
their first year at college had little exposure to reading classics in
high school and theygenerally dislike reading for pleasure.&nbsp;&nbsp;
I remember the day we discussed how the story started to be told by the
Creature rather than by Frankenstein.&nbsp; Students could not believe
that a novel could shift perspective; also, they held a strong media image
of the monster and the name Frankenstein, so it was difficult for them
to break this connection.&nbsp; Also, studdents told me that they had never
read a story for symbolic meaning.&nbsp; These students had not taken AP
courses in high school and had minimal exposure to reading a book closely
by asking questions about its author's life, by connecting questions about
life to the events in the plot, or by beginningto question the historical
context for the book.
<p>I think this book could provide a fantastic framework for an interdisciplinary
class of history, political science, philosophy, science, and literature.&nbsp;
The book is complicated but very exciting.
<p>To avoid plagiarism, I had them engage in a six week "I-Search" paper
project related to the novel, they completed study-guide questions that
I created, they designed vocabulary collages for words that they identified
as hard to understand, they completed questions that they answered in realtion
to the inquiry that they were following.&nbsp; At the end of thie six weeks,
students discussed what they learned through this process of asking a question
about the novel.
<p>Truly,
<br>Gail
<p>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
<p>Dr. Gail S. Corso
<br>Associate Professor of Communication Arts
<br>Coordinator of Writing
<br>Neumann College
<br>Aston, PA 19014-1298
<p>gcorso@neumann.edu
<br>610-558-5515
<p>Julia Shugert wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>How do you determine DRP (Degrees of Reading Power)?</blockquote>
</html>

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