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In Search of the Novel:Teacher-TalkNovel

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From: gcor (gcor@jersey.net)
Date: Thu Mar 23 2000 - 10:22:49 EST

  • Next message: Margaret Hagemeister: "Re: Question"

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    Hi Dennee,

    I have taught the novel recently to a small group of readers in a college
    developmental reading course. The language in the novel is very difficult. I
    found that I had to discuss each chapter of the book, and read aloud whole
    passages to help students decipher meaning. For each section I developed
    study guide questions.

    Students did "I-Search" type research papers related to an aspect of the book
    that interested each of them. I started this process by sharing with them
    Internet sites about Frankenstein, and we had a book in our library about
    genetic engineering. The students were fascinated by Mary Shelley's life,
    too, and several of them began to think that the monster was symbolic of her
    existence.

    We viewed three versions of the film after we completed discussing each
    chapter of the novel.

    If you add this novel, the students will experience a degree of frustration
    with language, but it then becomes an occasion for discussing how language
    changes with the time, how literature reflects the author's identity, how
    literature reflects philosophy, religion, history, and science.

    I have not yet viewed the videoconference about this novel,but I look forward
    to receiving a copy soon.

    Truly,

    Gail Corso

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Dr. Gail S. Corso
    Associate Professor of Comunication Arts
    Neumann College
    Aston, PA 19014-1298
    gcorso@neumann.edu

    Denee Stevenson wrote:

    > Although I have not read the novel Frankenstein, I've been impressed with
    > the depth of issues the 11th grade teacher has his students explore in the
    > video
    > we see for the course. I have juniors in class who, I feel, would relish
    > discussing
    > these issues of science, creation, creator, etc. My concern is that they
    > have low
    > reading levels and low interest in reading.
    >
    > How difficult is the text of the book? Has anyone used this novel with
    > students
    > who have below-grade level reading abilities and interests?
    >
    > Denee Stevenson
    >
    > stevenson@basd.k12.pa.us

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    <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
    <html>
    Hi Dennee,
    <p>I have taught the novel recently to a small group of readers in a college
    developmental reading course.&nbsp; The language in the novel is very difficult.&nbsp;
    I found that I had to discuss each chapter of the book, and read aloud
    whole passages to help students decipher meaning.&nbsp; For each section
    I developed study guide questions.
    <p>Students did "I-Search" type research papers related to an aspect of
    the book that interested each of them.&nbsp; I started this process by
    sharing with them Internet sites about <i>Frankenstein</i>, and we had
    a book in our library about genetic engineering.&nbsp; The students were
    fascinated by Mary Shelley's life, too, and several of them began to think
    that the monster was symbolic of her existence.
    <p>We viewed three versions of the film after we completed discussing each
    chapter of the novel.
    <p>If you add this novel, the students will experience a degree of frustration
    with language, but it then becomes an occasion for discussing how language
    changes with the time, how literature reflects the author's identity, how
    literature reflects philosophy, religion, history, and science.
    <p>I have not yet viewed the videoconference about this novel,but I look
    forward to receiving a copy soon.
    <p>Truly,
    <p>Gail Corso
    <p>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    <p>Dr. Gail S. Corso
    <br>Associate Professor of Comunication Arts
    <br>Neumann College
    <br>Aston, PA 19014-1298
    <br>gcorso@neumann.edu
    <p>Denee Stevenson wrote:
    <blockquote TYPE=CITE>Although I have not read the novel Frankenstein,
    I've been impressed with
    <br>the depth of issues the 11th grade teacher has his students explore
    in the
    <br>video
    <br>we see for the course.&nbsp; I have juniors in class who, I feel, would
    relish
    <br>discussing
    <br>these issues of science, creation, creator, etc.&nbsp; My concern is
    that they
    <br>have low
    <br>reading levels and low interest in reading.
    <p>How difficult is the text of the book?&nbsp;&nbsp; Has anyone used this
    novel with
    <br>students
    <br>who have below-grade level reading abilities and interests?
    <p>Denee Stevenson
    <p>stevenson@basd.k12.pa.us</blockquote>
    </html>

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