Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

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In Search of the Novel:Teacher-TalkNovel

Subject: Re: Technology Response

From: Andrea Martine (martinea@basd.k12.pa.us)
Date: Tue Mar 21 2000 - 09:50:07 EST


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Dear Jennifer,
     Students today seem to have the attitude that anything is possible. I
do not think that they are as disturbed by the "dark side" of these issues
as older generations are. Like you said, they are very forward thinking. I
guess that that is a positive attitude to express; otherwise nothing would
have ever been advanced. We do need to think of the extremes of these
progressive ideas. The recent hacking of the internet sites, the idea that
clones pigs' body parts could be used for human transplants, the fact that
we can take our own genes and generate body parts that we might need right
now...Where does it end?
     I see some of the traditional values quickly being forgotten for
progress by our students today. Maybe they should read Walter M. Miller,
Jr.'s book: A Canticle for Lebowitz which relates past history to the
future of man. "Harrison Bergeron" a short story by Vonnegut also gives so
much to ponder and discuss along this line. Don't forget 1984.
     The movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" is amother good one, but the
technology wins in this one!
     Good question,
     Andrea
----------
> From: Jennifer Hack <jhack@mail.phila.k12.pa.us>
> To: Multiple recipients of list <Teacher-TalkNovel@learner.org>
> Subject: Re: Question
> Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2000 10:26:55 -0500 (EST)
>
> Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World examine
the
> impact of scientific technology on humanity.
>
> Given today's climate involving the reality of bioengineering, gene
> therapy, and cloning, I find that the mores and values of my students seem
> to reflect an extremely progressive tone.
>
> Is this true for the students in other classrooms or are the more
> traditional values of the past still prevalent among your students?
>
>

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Dear Jennifer,<BR>
     Students today seem to have the attitude that anything is possible. I do not think that they are as disturbed by the "dark side" of these issues as older generations are. Like you said, they are very forward thinking. I guess that that is a positive attitude to express; otherwise nothing would have ever been advanced. We do need to think of the extremes of these progressive ideas. The recent hacking of the internet sites, the idea that clones pigs' body parts could be used for human transplants, the fact that we can take our own genes and generate body parts that we might need right now...Where does it end? <BR>
     I see some of the traditional values quickly being forgotten for progress by our students today. Maybe they should read Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s book: <I>A Canticle for Lebowitz</I> which relates past history to the future of man. "Harrison Bergeron" a short story by Vonnegut also gives so much to ponder and discuss along this line. Don't forget <I>1984</I>. <BR>
     The movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" is amother good one, but the technology wins in this one!<BR>
     Good question,<BR>
     Andrea<BR>
----------<BR>
> From: Jennifer Hack <jhack@mail.phila.k12.pa.us> <BR>
> To: Multiple recipients of list <Teacher-TalkNovel@learner.org> <BR>
> Subject: Re: Question <BR>
> Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2000 10:26:55 -0500 (EST)<BR>
> <BR>
> Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World examine the<BR>
> impact of scientific technology on humanity.<BR>
> <BR>
> Given today's climate involving the reality of bioengineering, gene<BR>
> therapy, and cloning, I find that the mores and values of my students seem<BR>
> to reflect an extremely progressive tone.<BR>
> <BR>
> Is this true for the students in other classrooms or are the more<BR>
> traditional values of the past still prevalent among your students?<BR>
> <BR>
> <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
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