Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

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Introduction
Topics
Topic Introduction
Judith Ortiz Cofer Reads...
Assignment
Write On Your Own
Read Other Responses
Use Assignment In Class

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Three Readings
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First Steps A Shared Path Different Audiences Different Purposes
Usage and Mechanics Providing Feedback on Student Writing Learning from Professional Writers Writing in the 21st Century
You can listen to Judith Ortiz Cofer as she reads this work.
Listen to the audio.Play

ESL: Why am I here?

An interrogative sentence asks a question. It begins with a capital letter and ends with a question mark.
These are interrogative sentences:

Mr. Golden: I will give you examples then you will turn to the person on your right and ask them a question:
Mr. Golden: May I have your complete attention?
Classmate: Are you stupid?
Mr. Golden: What do they eat in your country?
Classmate: Is your family on welfare?
Mr. Golden: Do you speak English?
Will you speak up?
Will you shut up?
Why do I bother?
Let us try again: Are you an American?
Class: Will this be on the test?

Make interrogative sentences from these words.

your excuse
in school
at home
a friend of yours
a friend of mine
good teacher
angry man
your language
about my country
work for our money
an American
Yes
No

Excerpts from Call Me Maria: My Life in 100 Scenes by Judith Ortiz Cofer used by permission of Orchard Books/Scholastic

"And so that's one of the ESL lessons. The other one is that she shows Mister Golden one of her poems that is a bilingual poem. And he says, 'You're a poet.' And so this one is on the exclamatory sentence."

ESL: I am a poet!

An exclamatory sentence is a strong emotion expressed in words. It begins with a capital letter and ends with an exclamation mark.

These are exclamatory sentences:

Mr. Golden is a musician!
Mrs. Golden is a singer!
He thinks I am a good writer!
I wrote a poem!
He wrote music for my words!
She wants to record it as a song!

Use these words in exclamatory sentences:

the poetry contest
fear
laughing at me
alarm
happy in English
happy in Spanish
alegre
triste
end of the year assembly

Excerpts from Call Me Maria: My Life in 100 Scenes by Judith Ortiz Cofer used by permission of Orchard Books/Scholastic

And the last lesson is the subject of a sentence. It's called "I Am a Poet".

ESL: I am a poet.

Subject of a Sentence
The subject of a sentence is the part talked about.
The subjects of these sentences are underlined:

The girl thinks she is an American.
Marķa thinks she is good in English.
The girl can write.
Marķa speaks with an accent.
The poem has an accent just like Marķa's.
The poem is bilingual.
The teacher likes Marķa.
He said to the class, why can't you be more like Marķa Alegre?
He said to the class, why must you always act like fools?
The class laughed at Marķa.

Find the subject in these sentences:

Their laughter is what Marķa Alegre feared.
Their mockery of her accent, their teasing about her poetry
turned her into Marķa Triste.
Poets are often unhappy, Mr. Golden said and almost always poor.

Excerpts from Call Me Maria: My Life in 100 Scenes by Judith Ortiz Cofer used by permission of Orchard Books/Scholastic

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