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    To invite readers into the text, ask
"What do you think this story is going to be about? What told you that?"
"What does the word "adventures" mean to you? Do you think the author might use "adventures" in the same way?
"When do you think this story may have been written? What makes you think that? What do you know about what life was like then?
To build on readers' past experiences, ask:
"What have you heard about Alice in Wonderland before?"
    To build on readers' past experiences, ask:
"Does anyone know anything about Lewis Carroll?"
"Has anyone read anything by Lewis Carroll before? What did you think about his writing?"
    To build on readers' past experiences, ask:
"This heading says we're going to be reading the chapter one. What does this tell you about the rest of the story? Do you think it'll be a long story or a short one? Do you think it'll be a true story or a story the author made up?"
"Have you ever read a chapter book before? What are they like?"
To invite students to create their own understandings of the text, ask:
"What do you think this chapter is going to be about?"
    To invite students to create their own understandings of the text, ask:
"The setting is the place where the story takes place. What is the setting here? Think about the characters and the place they are. What does this place look like? What do the characters look like? What are they doing?"
"What do you think about what Alice says? Are books with pictures better than books without pictures? Why?"
"Would you feel like Alice does if you were sitting on the river bank? Have you ever felt like Alice does now? Describe that time for me."
    To invite students to develop their understandings of the text, ask:
"What have you found out here about the setting of the story? Has this changed your mind about the way you are seeing the story in your mind?"
    To invite students to create their own understandings of the text, ask:
"How would you feel if you were sitting there, a rabbit ran by you, and you thought you heard it say something? Would you have felt, as Alice did, that it was "quite natural"?
"Why do you think it took Alice such a long time to react? Has that ever happened to you?"
"What do you think about the Rabbit?"
    To invite students to create their own understandings of the text, ask:
"What would you have done right now if you were Alice?"
    To invite students to develop their understandings of the text, ask:
"Now that you've seen what Alice did, do you want to change your mind about what you might do at this point in the story?
    To invite students to create their own understandings of the text, ask:
"What does the tunnel look like in your mind? How is this setting different from the field where Alice first saw the Rabbit?
    To invite students to develop their understandings, ask:
"What do you think about this description of the setting? Does it change the picture you had in your mind of what the rabbit-hole looked like?"
To invite students to extend their understandings of the text, ask:
"What does this description of the tunnel make you think about the story as a whole? Is this a fairly normal tunnel? What do you think this says about the story? What kinds of things would you expect to happen from this point on?"
"What do you think about Alice now? Do you feel differently about her than when you just met her? How?

    To invite students to develop their understandings of the text, ask:
"Has there ever been a time when you felt like this? What was going on?"
"What do you think will happen next?"

    To invite students to develop their understandings of the text, ask:
"How is Alice reacting to her fall? Does she remind you of anyone else you may have met in life or in a story? What do you think of her so far?"
"What do you think about the story so far? Do you want to hear/read more?"
"Are there any parts of the story you'd like to hear/read again?"
    To invite students to develop their understandings of the text, ask:
"What are you thinking right now?"
"What kind of questions do you have now about what we have read?"
"What do you think about the way the author is telling the story?"
"Does the story so far remind you of any that you have read in the past? Tell me how they are the same?"
    To invite students to extend their understandings of the text, ask:
"What do you think is going to happen now?"
"Do you like Alice?"
"What words/lines of text struck you as we/you read?"
"What do you think happened to the White Rabbit?"
"Do you like the way the author is telling the story?"
"If Lewis Carroll were here now, what question would you ask him about this story?"
"If Alice were a student in this school, how might this story be different? How might it be the same?"
"Has what happened to Alice suggested anything to you about the way you live your life?"
"What was the funniest thing that happened in this part of the text?"
"If you were to draw a picture of this part of the story, what colors would you use?"
"If this were a movie, what music might you hear when this part of the story happened?"
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