Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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  Workshop 1: Freedom of Religion  
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Workshop 1

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Teacher Perspectives: How you know when you’ve done a good job

Kristen Borges: One of the things that really lets me know that the lesson had an impact and was an effective lesson is that students are still talking about it and asking questions about the issues that were discussed in class beyond the bell schedule.

It’s really important for me as a teacher to be able to build relationships with my students and be able to personalize the learning that’s going on in the classroom. One way I can see if I’m being effective is if that relationship continues beyond my one hour. If students come back for help in other classes or even beyond the year that I have them and ask for advice as far as what they might want to do after high school or have conversations about some classes that they might be taking, that to me proves that I was effective as a person to help them set and reach some goals as far as life-long learning is concerned.

I learn that students really value my class when they themselves have experienced some kind of situation in their life that comes back to the content they learned in my class. Perhaps a world event [that] they would come and talk about with me and [recall] some of the material that we might have learned in my class and how that is affecting this world event. Or a particular student who might feel that their individual rights are not being heard or are being violated will come back to me and talk about some of the legal issues that might arise around their individual rights.

I also feel successful by the way that the students feel empowered to impact society. When I see students go and take on community projects or even just school-wide projects and present some leadership skills that I didn’t necessarily identify early on in my class but now they may possess, I think that I’ve been effective as a civics teacher.


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