Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

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Sub Image2:Macro to Micro Structures
         
 
Workshops
1) Atoms and Molecules2) Macro to Micro Structures
3) Energetics and Dynamics4) Theory and Practice in Chemical Systems5) Chemical Design6) The Chemistry of Life7) Chemistry and the Environment8) Chemistry at the Interface
 

Unit 2.7 Using Imagination
This unit deals with creative ways to use students’ imagination and scientific evidence to make a connection between micro-level processes and observable events.
Video program cues: 45:35 — 57:40

Signals from within

“There are very distinct parts of the IR spectrum which tell you [about molecular structure]. It’s like a symphony or a rock band: if there’s no guitar, the band will sound very different than when there are three guitars and a bass…. These are all different frequencies…. In the IR it’s the exact same thing; we cannot see it but the instruments tell us: This is the frequency of the O-H, of the C-H, of the C-O. If you see them all together, you don’t know it’s a methanol molecule, but you know that they all are there.”

Dr. Lou Allamandola
NASA Ames Research Laboratory, California

Reading
Georgios. T. (1997)' Atomic and Molecular Structure in Chemical Education: A Critical Analysis from Various Perspectives of Science Education, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 74, pp: 922-925.

Featuring molecules class

Veatta Berry asks students to act out a molecule in solution.

Activity

Links

  • Another class activity about water that will involve all students in a creative way
  • An interesting article by Dudley Herschbach who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1986. In the article he suggests, among other things, this metaphor: " chemistry is like an impressionistic painting."

Readings
Ponnadurai, R (2000)' Students as Solids, Liquids, and Gases, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 77, pp: 485.

Nicoll , G., Francisco,J.S., Nakhleh, M. (2001)' An Investigation of the Value of Using Concept Maps in General Chemistry, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 78, No. 8, pp: 1111-1117.

Russell, J. W. Kozma, R.B., Jones, T. Wykoff, J., Marx, N., Davis, J..(1997)' Use of Simultaneous-Synchronized Macroscopic, Microscopic, and Symbolic Representations To Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Chemical Concepts, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 74, No. 3, pp: 330.

Relating macroscopic and microscopic

Teachers' Forum

“In introducing chemistry and the idea of chemistry, I start by saying that chemistry is the study of matter, and then I do a series of three demonstrations, showing a precipitation reaction, formation of gas and a color change. Then I say that in all these instances, a chemical change has occurred. And later on we talk about evidences for chemical change, so this is right in there.”

Irene Walsh
St. Andrew's Episcopal School, Maryland

“Our biggest problem is that 90% of what they see isn’t really on the level of what they’re expected to know. You see the color change, you see this happen, but they have to understand it on the level of atoms and molecules, whether it’s symbolic, whether it’s demonstration or calculations; it is something that they are never going to see. So we have got to, about almost everything we do, cut out models or do something where they can physically manipulate on the table.”

Caryn Galatis

“I am kind of lucky. I’m in Washington, D.C., and last year was the day of the family march, and on the news of cameras from up above. So I explained to them, that when you see a crowd from up above, how it looks and how it behaves was totally different from when you’re down on the ground seeing individual people. So that kind of separated the micro, which is looking at an individual person, vs. looking at the macro, which is looking from a helicopter.”

Dr. Michael Clarke
Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Washington, D.C.

Readings
Kebbekus, B.B. (2000)' A Chemical-Medical Mystery: Gold Jewelry and Black Marks on Skin, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 77, No.10, pp: 1298-1299.

Nicoll , G., Francisco,J.S., Nakhleh, M. (2001)' An Investigation of the Value of Using Concept Maps in General Chemistry, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 78, No. 8, pp: 1111-1117.

Russell, J. W. Kozma, R.B., Jones, T. Wykoff, J., Marx, N., Davis, J..(1997') Use of Simultaneous-Synchronized Macroscopic, Microscopic, and Symbolic Representations To Enhance the Teaching and Learning of Chemical Concepts, 'Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 74, No. 3, pp: 330.

Chemistry and mystery

“Predating the chemistry of our time and Abe Lincoln, early alchemists were in search of all life’s mysteries: the philosophers’ stone, the elixir of life, changing base metals into gold. Much of this work was cloaked in mystery. Hence, my being here. Does any one here have a base metal that I can borrow? No takers, huh? I suppose we will just have to use this penny. Back in those days, the alchemists had far fewer elements to work with. However, from our airs to our winds, through the waters of our oceans, through the salts of our Earth, and through the fires of our suns, the Alchemists sought transformation, and from that chemistry was born.”

Alain Nu
Mystery Expert

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