Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Sub Image2:Macro to Micro Structures
         
 
Workshops
1) Atoms and Molecules2) Macro to Micro Structures 3) Energetics and Dynamics 4) Theory and Practice in Chemical Systems 5) Chemical Design 6) The Chemistry of Life 7) Chemistry and the Environment 8) Chemistry at the Interface
 
From: MARTINA FALCONER (tfalcone@comcast.net)
Date: Thu Jan 23 2003 - 19:37:26 EST


Fiona - wow ! do our classrooms sound alike! I am encouraged to find
that maybe what I am doing is the right thing! Tina

----- Original Message -----
From: Fiona Rae <FRae@hopkinton.k12.ma.us>
Date: Thursday, January 23, 2003 2:41 pm
Subject: RE: [Channel-talkchemistry] workshop 1 ideas

> Our students come to Chemistry after half a year of physical
> science in ninth grade so rather than repeating the instruction,
> the students do a research project on the Development of the Atom.
> I provide a rubric that covers the models and apparatus used by
> Democrtius, Dalton, Thomson, and Rutherford. For the project the
> students can choose to present in various ways. I now have great
> models of the Crookes' tube and the Gold Foil Expt. from students
> that help our visual learners with visualizing the set-up. Models
> of the atom at various stages of development are also great fro
> teh students to see.
> I also do an element project with the students where physical and
> chemical properties are researched as well as electron
> configuration, which help reinforce what I am teaching at the
> time. I assigned the project by letting students pick from a stack
> of periodic table hot cups that have one of the symbols
> highlighted. That way the students pick randomly and no two
> students have the same element. The students are funny about
> taking ownership of their elements when later in the year we look
> the a certain student as the "expert" if a question ever arises
> about their element. At the end of the unit the students have a
> puzzle to complete by fitting physical and chemical properties of
> "unknown elements" together.
> I was happy to see the marble board in action as a demo. We bought
> one a couple of years ago and I have not used it since I could
> not work out how to show the orbitals. However I liked the idea of
> the two boards side by side to show electron transfer. I have
> never played the rummy with cards but play element bingo and ion
> bingo (for prizes) to help the students learn their element facts
> and ion changes and formulas.
> I'm afraid the balloons did not do anything for me because, as the
> teacher said in the video, the central atoms around the electron
> clouds are not there. Pity, because the shapes are great. Can
> anyone out there help me to make the concept workable since they
> are great visual apart from that problem?
> As to the pre workshop, liked the chicken mesh representing the
> layers of graphite. I may use that next year. We have a paper
> model of the C 60 that the students color and put together while
> they watch the Buckyball video. These hang from the ceiling of the
> classroom all year! Again hands on and ownership seem to help get
> the student invested.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Niffenegger, Tammie [Tammie.Niffenegger@pwssd.k12.wi.us]
> Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 11:31 AM
> To: 'channel-talkchemistry@learner.org'
> Subject: RE: [Channel-talkchemistry] workshop 1 ideas
>
>
> I also have the students make a timeline of their own, but we do
> not make a
> class timeline. Who does what part? I am interested.
>
> Also I have them each research an element and make square for a
> huge class
> periodic table that includes who discovered, when, what does it
> looks like,
> and what does it do? I am interested in the advertising though.
> Thatsounds fun!!
>
> I have never played the rummy game with the cards. In your
> opinion, does
> this really help with the students understanding? Curious.
>
> I have never had the students put together a table like Mendeleev
> either. I
> run out of time in the year as it is and feel I do not have time.
> I am
> wrong for doing this?
>
> thanks for your input.
>
> Tammie
> Port Washington, WI
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: MARTINA FALCONER [tfalcone@comcast.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 8:09 PM
> To: channel-talkchemistry@learner.org
> Subject: [Channel-talkchemistry] workshop 1 ideas
>
>
>
> After watching the first videos I thought about some ways my
> department does similar things that work for us in chemistry:
>
> 1. To introduce the atom we do a research project where each kid
> researches someone involved in developing the model of the atom (
> from
> a Woodrow Wilson Workshop), we also have made models of some of
> the
> most important experiments, like the Rutherford gold foil
> experiment,
> that are hands-on for students to use. The research gets put
> together
> into a class timeline and from that we build the concepts of the
> modern atom.
>
> 2. On the periodic table we also research. Each students get one
> element to adopt and must design an advertising campaign for that
> element. On the research sheet they have to find various
> properties
> and industrial uses. We assign elements 1-36. Once we have all the
> advertising presented, we have the class form a living periodic
> table
> and then we start having them read out certain properties to see
> if
> they can perdict the trends. Works great! I also have this
> learning
> game that uses playing cards to show how Mendeleev predicted
> missing
> elements. If you are interested I can look up the name.
>
> 3. The wooden marble board works great on valence electrons and so
> forth. I also have a formula rummy, but my rummy cards have
> corners -
> two if the charge is +2, three if the charge is +3, while the
> negative
> charges are indented. Molecules then "fit" together and students
> can
> write formulas from that.After a while they no longer need the
> rummy
> cards.
>
> 4. I also use the ballons and think they work best, but I aslo
> have
> snap on ropes tied to a central ring and have students play
> terminal
> atoms and try to maneuver themselves as far away from each other
> as
> possible - fun!
>
> Tina
>
>
>
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