Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Science

Results: 13 Videos

A Student Tries to Explain Why There Are Seashells on...
A Student Tries to Explain Why There Are Seashells on...

A student's reasonable misconception is compared to the current scientific consensus in interpreting the evidence for the formation of the Himalayas. View Video

A Volcanologist Dances on Lava
A Volcanologist Dances on Lava

On the Big Island of Hawaii, Volcanologist Dave Sherrod treads on the newest rock on the planet to show how quickly lava hardens when it emerges at the surface. View Video

An Analogy for the Effects of Temperature and Pressure...
An Analogy for the Effects of Temperature and Pressure...

Students in a playground act out an analogy for how temperature and pressure control the behavior of rocks in the Earth. View Video

Classroom Exploration of Flowing Solids
Classroom Exploration of Flowing Solids

Using hybrid fluid solid-liquid materials (such as Silly Putty®) in the classroom, students explore the concept of a flowing solid. View Video

Continental Drift
Continental Drift

The fact that the jigsaw-puzzle-like fit of the coastlines of Africa and South America looked as if they had been attached in the past gave rise to the theory of continental drift. View Video

From Continental Drift to Tectonic Plates
From Continental Drift to Tectonic Plates

Ocean floor features reveal the signature of tectonic plates, large, sometimes continent-sized rigid structures in the Earth's crust that can move independently of each other. View Video

How Far Can We Drill? Temperature and Pressure in...
How Far Can We Drill? Temperature and Pressure in...

Extreme drill holes for research have only reached 14km below the surface—less than 0.2% of the distance to the other side. View Video

Mountains Are Formed by Plate Collision
Mountains Are Formed by Plate Collision

Two continental plates collide, creating heat and pressure that bend rock and create mountain ranges. View Video

Seismic Waves Tell Us About the Different Layers of the...
Seismic Waves Tell Us About the Different Layers of the...

Seismic waves produced by geological equipment or earthquakes can be used to probe the Earth's interior. View Video

Simulating Seismic Waves Part 1: A Fifth Grade Class...
Simulating Seismic Waves Part 1: A Fifth Grade Class...

Fifth grade students start an investigation into how sound waves (P and S waves) can be used to reveal the structure of the Earth. View Video

Simulating Seismic Waves Part 2: Students Experiment...
Simulating Seismic Waves Part 2: Students Experiment...

Second grade students do a classroom activity that simulates how seismic waves travel through solids and liquids in the Earth. View Video

Slow Flowing Solids Explain Tectonic Plate...
Slow Flowing Solids Explain Tectonic Plate...

Slow Flowing Solids Explain Tectonic Plate Movement View Video

Spreading and Subducting Can Move Continents
Spreading and Subducting Can Move Continents

The opening of the Atlantic Ocean between two tectonic plates at a spreading ridge separated the two continents. View Video


Results: 1-13 of 13