Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

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Science

Results: 40 Videos

A Student Tries to Explain Why There Are Seashells on...
A Student Tries to Explain Why There Are Seashells on...

A student's reasonable misconception is compared to the current scientific consensus in interpreting the evidence for the formation of the Himalayas. View Video

A Volcanologist Dances on Lava
A Volcanologist Dances on Lava

On the Big Island of Hawaii, Volcanologist Dave Sherrod treads on the newest rock on the planet to show how quickly lava hardens when it emerges at the surface. View Video

An Analogy for the Effects of Temperature and Pressure...
An Analogy for the Effects of Temperature and Pressure...

Students in a playground act out an analogy for how temperature and pressure control the behavior of rocks in the Earth. View Video

Cape Cod's Aquifers
Cape Cod's Aquifers

Students in Mashpee, Massachusetts create a model of the ground water systems in Cape Cod. View Video

Classroom Exploration of Flowing Solids
Classroom Exploration of Flowing Solids

Using hybrid fluid solid-liquid materials (such as Silly Putty®) in the classroom, students explore the concept of a flowing solid. View Video

Climate and Rate of Soil Formation
Climate and Rate of Soil Formation

Two soil profiles in Hawaii demonstrate how warmer temperatures and increased rainfall can contribute to rapid rates of soil formation. View Video

Continental Drift
Continental Drift

The fact that the jigsaw-puzzle-like fit of the coastlines of Africa and South America looked as if they had been attached in the past gave rise to the theory of continental drift. View Video

Demo of Shield Volcanoes versus...
Demo of Shield Volcanoes versus...

A demonstration of viscosity and gas content of different types of magmas using chocolate syrup, mayonnaise, and seltzer water. View Video

Following a Rock in a Stream
Following a Rock in a Stream

By following sediments moved from the mountains to the sea, a mountain stream illustrates the process of erosion. View Video

From Continental Drift to Tectonic Plates
From Continental Drift to Tectonic Plates

Ocean floor features reveal the signature of tectonic plates, large, sometimes continent-sized rigid structures in the Earth's crust that can move independently of each other. View Video

Hawaii Is a Hot Spot Volcano
Hawaii Is a Hot Spot Volcano

The hot spot below Hawaii provides evidence for plate movement: as the Pacific Plate moves over the hot spot, it creates a string of islands. View Video

How Deep Does Soil Typically Go?
How Deep Does Soil Typically Go?

On average, soil only extends about one meter below the surface. Compared to the size of the Earth, soil is just a thin veneer on the surface. View Video

How Did Cape Cod Form? Part 1: Observing...
How Did Cape Cod Form? Part 1: Observing...

Part 1 of a three-part investigation into the sediments revealed at the ocean shore in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. View Video

How Did Cape Cod Form? Part 2: Evidence from Mountain...
How Did Cape Cod Form? Part 2: Evidence from Mountain...

Part 2 of a three-part investigation: ice flowing in the form of mountain glaciers is an important source of erosion in colder climates. View Video

How did Cape Cod form? Part 3: Continental...
How did Cape Cod form? Part 3: Continental...

Part 3 of a three-part investigation: over several episodes ending about 18,000 years ago, continental glaciers formed over much of North America. View Video

How Far Can We Drill? Temperature and Pressure in...
How Far Can We Drill? Temperature and Pressure in...

Extreme drill holes for research have only reached 14km below the surface—less than 0.2% of the distance to the other side. View Video

Investigating Soil Composition
Investigating Soil Composition

By digging a pit in either Hawaii or Massachusetts, scientists learn about soil composition and how it is formed. View Video

Metamorphic Rocks...
Metamorphic Rocks...

A rock outcrop on Lake Champlain has two adjacent rock sections: one horizontal, one vertical. Keith Klepeis investigates a potential cause. View Video

Metamorphic Rocks...
Metamorphic Rocks...

Keith Klepeis looks for possible sources of heat and pressure that could have deformed the outcropping at Clay Point in this continuing investigation. View Video

Minerals Are Composed of Elements
Minerals Are Composed of Elements

Minerals are made of elements, as is all matter. View Video

Mountain Building: A Tug-of-War
Mountain Building: A Tug-of-War

Mountains are shaped by forces from below (plate tectonics) and forces at the surface (erosion). View Video

Mountains Are Formed by Plate Collision
Mountains Are Formed by Plate Collision

Two continental plates collide, creating heat and pressure that bend rock and create mountain ranges. View Video

Plants Help Create New Soil
Plants Help Create New Soil

Geologist Andy Kurtz describes how lichens and plants speed the process of soil accumulation. View Video

Radiometric Dating of a Rock
Radiometric Dating of a Rock

How do geoscientists determine the approximate age of a rock? (example: Uranimum-235) View Video

Sedimentary Rock Formation
Sedimentary Rock Formation

One type of sedimentary rock is formed when materials such as gravel, sand, silt, and clay are deposited in new locations. View Video

Seismic Waves Tell Us About the Different Layers of the...
Seismic Waves Tell Us About the Different Layers of the...

Seismic waves produced by geological equipment or earthquakes can be used to probe the Earth's interior. View Video

Simulating Seismic Waves Part 1: A Fifth Grade Class...
Simulating Seismic Waves Part 1: A Fifth Grade Class...

Fifth grade students start an investigation into how sound waves (P and S waves) can be used to reveal the structure of the Earth. View Video

Simulating Seismic Waves Part 2: Students Experiment...
Simulating Seismic Waves Part 2: Students Experiment...

Second grade students do a classroom activity that simulates how seismic waves travel through solids and liquids in the Earth. View Video

Slow Flowing Solids Explain Tectonic Plate...
Slow Flowing Solids Explain Tectonic Plate...

Slow Flowing Solids Explain Tectonic Plate Movement View Video

Soil Formation...
Soil Formation...

On the Big Island of Hawaii, lava from volcanoes forms new rock. Physical and chemical processes contribute to the weathering of rock into sediment and soil. View Video

Spreading and Subducting Can Move Continents
Spreading and Subducting Can Move Continents

The opening of the Atlantic Ocean between two tectonic plates at a spreading ridge separated the two continents. View Video

Spreading Ridge Volcanoes
Spreading Ridge Volcanoes

Spreading ridge volcanoes form in the deep sea where two plates are moving apart. View Video

Subduction Zone Volcanoes
Subduction Zone Volcanoes

Subduction zones are where rock slides under less-dense rock. Magma, enriched with highly pressurized steam and CO2, rises to the surface under subduction boundaries, making volcanoes. View Video

The Age of the Appalachian Mountains
The Age of the Appalachian Mountains

The Appalachian Mountains are compared to the much higher, but younger, Himalayas. View Video

The Role of Sand, Silt, and Clay Components in Soil...
The Role of Sand, Silt, and Clay Components in Soil...

Soil composition is important in determining its qualities such as flow rate, which can be demonstrated by pouring water through containers. View Video

Two Different Kinds of Volcanoes
Two Different Kinds of Volcanoes

Scientists Chuck Blay and Dave Sherrod compare Hawaiian volcanoes to Mt. Saint Helens. View Video

Types of Fossils
Types of Fossils

The formation of two types of fossils are shown and discussed: an imprint in a rock and minerals replacing the shells of dead organisms. View Video

Volcanic Gases
Volcanic Gases

The gases that make up our atmosphere were released during volcanic eruptions in both the past and present. View Video

Volcanoes—Sources and Types of Lava
Volcanoes—Sources and Types of Lava

Scientists describe how mantle rock melts into magma and how the more buoyant, liquid magma floats toward the Earth's surface. View Video

Where Does the Sediment on a Beach Come From?
Where Does the Sediment on a Beach Come From?

Sediment on a beach contributes to the vast continental shelf offshore over time, but this does not explain where the sediment came from. View Video


Results: 1-40 of 40