Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU
LINK: Social Studies in Action Home Image of a middle school student.
LINK: Population and Resource Distribution Home
LINK: About the Class
LINK: Watching the video
Connecting to Your Teaching
LINK: Standards
LINK: Resources

Connecting to Your Teaching

Image of a notebook with the following text displayed: Reflect: As you reflect on these questions, jot down your responses or discuss them in a group.

Reflecting on Your Practice

  • What preparation do students need to ensure success when doing a role-play or simulation?
  • What topics in your curriculum lend themselves to teaching students about the distribution of resources locally, nationally, and worldwide?
  • How would you address the sometimes-controversial topic of inequities in the distribution of resources?

Taking It Back to Your Classroom

  • Select an important issue in your curriculum and ask students to research it. Then have them create and role-play a television newscast about it. Students can assume the roles of news anchor, special reporter, expert in the field, and "man on the street."
  • Ask students to engage in a simulation related to world issues covered in your curriculum. The Population Resource Bureau provides current statistics, resource guides, and examples of simulations to help students better understand world issues. (See Resources.)
  • Students can participate in a model United Nations (UN) program, taking the role of a diplomatic representative to the UN from one of the member nations. One activity is to simulate the UN Commission on Sustainable Development. (See Resources for more information.) Model UN programs can be conducted with as few as 15 students from a single classroom, or with thousands of students from classrooms around the world.

For related print materials and Web sites, see Resources.

© Annenberg Foundation 2014. All rights reserved. Legal Policy