Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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  Connecting With The Arts Home   A Teaching Practices Library, 6-8
  Folk Tales Transformed
   
  Watching the Video
  Connecting to your Teaching
  Addtional Resources
  About the School
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  Program at a Glance
  School:

Intermediate

School 237

 
  Location:

Flushing, Queens, New York City

 
  Grade: 8
 
  Disciplines: Theatre
Visual Art
Language Arts
 
  Description:

Students use folk

tales as the basis for crafting original theatre pieces.

 
 

 

 

Connecting to Your Teaching

Reflect on Your Practice

  • Where in your curriculum might folk tales be an appropriate addition? Where, for example, might they engage students and provide ways to express what they know?
  • What opportunities exist at your school for planning a long-term project with other teachers that includes a “culminating event”?
  • How would you set such a project in motion? With whom might you collaborate? What disciplines would you involve?


Adaptations / Extensions to Consider

Scale it back: Have your students, working as a class, create their own folktale. Begin by selecting a moral that their story will convey, then go on to brainstorm characters and plot (using original folk tales as research sources), storyboard the story, and write the dialogue. Students might take turns delivering dramatic readings of the story, after which final revisions would be made.

Compare cultures: Have students read folk tales from different cultures around the world and discuss what the folk tales say about the cultures. Have student groups research a culture while they read its folk tales. Compare the storylines, settings, and morals of these folk tales with their own.

Connect to storytelling: Encourage students to recognize the elements and decisions made in storytelling. Have students select characters (their names and traits), settings (location, landscape, era), and dramatic events (such as betrayal, misunderstanding, broken promise), and then construct their stories either individually or in groups.

NEXT: Additional Resources, including unit materials that teachers used.

 

 
     

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