Journey North Maps Signs of Spring Home Page Report Your Sightings! Explore Signs of Spring Resources Signs of Spring Home Page Journey North Home Journey North Home
Maple Sugaring Study

What to Report

  • First sap flow
  • Leaf-out

Press Sightings to Submit your Observations

Maple sap first run
map | sightings

How to Participate
If Sugar Maple trees grow where you live, we hope you'll participate in Journey North's maple sugaring study. Although the trees look drab and gray in February, amazing changes are about to occur on the inside. Before leaf-out each spring, Sugar Maple trees produce a sweet sap that can be made into sugar. Learn how to tap a maple—and report the date of your FIRST sap run to Journey North.

Note: Even if you can't tap a tree, you can watch for the first sap to run. Simply find a broken branch on a Maple tree—and report to Journey North when the first sap flows.

If you have adopted a Sugar Maple for the leaf-out study this spring, you can track the phenology of your adopted maple tree on this chart:

  • Learn how to tap a maple—and report the date of your FIRST sap run to Journey North. Even if you can't tap a tree, you can watch for the first sap to run. Simply find a broken branch on a Maple tree—and report to Journey North when the first sap flows.

Adopt a maple tree this spring
and keep track of changes on this chart.

Maple Sugaring Spring Phenology Chart

Photos

 
Boiling A sap-cicle  

For more information about tapping, see: Massachusetts Maple Producers Association

 

Journey North Home Page   Facebook Pinterest Twitter   Annenberg Media Home Page
Copyright 1997-2014 Journey North. All Rights Reserved.   Contact Us    Search