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Sweet Pea's Long Journey
Bander Recaptures Special Rufous
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Review these reading strategies before diving into the slideshow with students. Select those that fit with your teaching goals and grade level.
BEFORE Watching/Reading the Slideshow

Make Predictions/Activate Prior Knowledge: Ask, What do you think rufous hummingbirds do in the fall? How do you think scientists know about where they travel?

Activate Prior Knowledge: Have students make KWL charts. The first two columns should list what students know and want to know about hummingbird banding and migration. (After watching the slideshow, students can fill in what they learned.)

DURING the Slideshow

Describe What You See: After students look closely at the photo on page 1, ask them to describe the hummer to a partner. Have them imagine they are "painting a picture" with words for someone who hasn't seen a bird like this.

Discuss: Why do you think bird banders send data on birds they capture to just one central laboratory?

Discuss: Why do you think so few tagged hummingbirds are recaptured? List some reasons.

Think Critically: What kinds of assumptions can a researcher make by looking at the amount of fat on a hummingbird's breast?

AFTER the Slideshow: Extending Learning

Creative Thinking/Shifting Perspective: Ask students to re-tell the story from the hummingbird's point of view. They can tell it verbally, in writing, or in drawings. Also have them give the hummingbird a name based on what they know about him and his adventure.

Procedural Writing/Sequencing: Write "How to Band a Hummingbird" on the board or chart paper. Ask students to make a list, in chronological order, of things a bander does.

Think Critically: What other types of questions might researchers be able to answer based on banding data? List at least three.

Math Challenge: Six months after she was released, Sweet Pea was found 2,100 miles away. If she headed Northwest right away, how many miles did she average per month? Per week?

In-Depth Information (Hummingbird Banding)

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