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Scroll down for a description of each answer, provided below by students from Nelson Lagoon School in Alaska.

gwhale_artifact01

gwhale_artifact02

gwhale_artifact03

baleen

bone from a bowhead whale

yarrow root

gwhale_artifact04

gwhale_artifact05

gwhale_artifact06

Alaska Flag

glass float balls from fishing nets

cotton plant

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petrified wood



1. Baleen, By Emanuel
Baleen is made of the same material as your fingernail. The whales use there baleen fto filter plankton out of the water for them to eat. They eat krill and plankton. The krill looks like little shrimp. The whales that have baleen are the blue what, the gray whale, the humpback whale, the right whale and the bowhead whale.

2. Bowhead Whale Bone, By Mia Concilus
This is a bone from a Bowhead Whale The Bowhead whale is one of the largest baleen whales. It eats plankton. It can grow to 65 feet long. It got its name from whale hunters who thought that its head looked like the bow of a boat.

3. Yarrow Root, a plant used to stop bleeding

4. Alaska Flag, By Mia
The Alaska flag was designed by a boy named Benny Benson in 1926. The blue represents the dark sky and the forget-me-not flower. He also drew the Big Dipper. It stands for Alaska's strength. The North Star is in the top right corner of the flag.

5. Glass Floats, By Eli
We find lots of glass balls here on the beach. They are floats from fishing nets use by Japanese fishermen. Some have nets still on them. I like the netted glass balls. I think they are cool.

6. Cotton Plants, By James
Cotton plants grow all over the Aleutuan Island and Alaska Peninsula. We have them in Nelson Lagoon. We pick them late in the summer and early fall. They look just like cotton.

7. Petrified Wood
This is a sample of petrified wood that we sometimes find on our beaches. Petrified wood is wood from dead trees that have turned into rocks after millions of years.

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