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November 5, 2004
Migration Day 27

Boone County, INDIANA!
On to Indiana! Photo OM

Yippee! The migration blew out of Illinois and into Indiana with clear weather and a slight tailwind. They took off at 6:23 a.m, and two hours later landed in Boone County, Indiana. They traveled 92.3 miles, for a grand total of 341.2 miles gone. Best of all, they skipped the site of Benton County, IN. With so many down days, it's no surprise that 3 birds turned back. Cranes #416 and 417 flew about 65 miles before they dropped out. All were crated and driven to the new stopover site.

Sizing up the Progress
Last year, Nov. 5 was day 21 and day 4 of weather delays in Morgan County, Indiana Joe expresssed this worry about the birds: "Keep them penned for 5 straight days and they may be reluctant to leave when the winds finally die down." That's what happened in the 2002 migration, when it took 37 days to reach the halfway point in Tennessee because of weather delays, yet only 8 days to finish the second half of the trip. During the first half of the journey south they were lucky to fly once a week. During the second half the weather let them fly every day! sure enough, several birds turned back or dropped out on the first half of the migration (the northern end), but all of the birds followed the trikes on each leg of the southern end. Maybe it will be the same story for the 2004 migration. Stay tuned!

Last Fall

This Fall

Map the Migration
Make your own map using the latest migration data


Yesterday we asked you to identify this mystery photo. It's nets that cover the top of the bird enclosure. The nets are bundled up and ready to move to the next site.
Photo Wayne Kryduba

Try This! Journaling Question
  • Yesterday, last year's "ultracranes" #304 and #311 landed to roost at 4:30 p.m. just 17 miles northwest of this year's ultralight flock. Migrating crane #302 was still 10 miles southeast of the migration team and birds. What does this tell you about the successful learning they gained from their ultralight "parents" one year ago?
  • Remember to update your migration chart!


Journey North is pleased to feature this educational adventure made possible by the
Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP).

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