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Wahoo! Zooming Ahead! (+119 Miles)
November 30, 2011: Migration Day 53

Ultralight plane andyoung Whooping crane.

Image: Veronica Anderton

The cranes were raring to go! They blasted out of their pen and flew right over the next stopover (56 miles) and on to Wayne County, Illinois (another 63 miles). WOW! It appears that six landed with today's lead pilot Richard, and Brooke and Joe landed with one bird each. One crane (ID unknown yet) landed in a field across the river from the pensite and is currently riding to the next stop in a crate in the van. This is the day we've been waiting for! We're jumping for joy at reaching the last stop in Illinois.

Teachers: "Volunteers Gordon Perkinson and Christine Barnes, both professional educators, are now on the migration team to visit classrooms and give presentations to students. If your school is within about a 30-to-40-mile radius of the migration route, you are invited to contact Gordon and Christine to inquire about a visit!

In the Classroom: Journal or Discussion

(a) Why are there three aircraft? Why do you think the cranes rarely fly as one large group with one ultralight leading?

(b for Bonus) Make comparisons among Whooping cranes, sandhill cranes and Canada Geese and answer questions when you dig into today's lesson: Flight Formation: The V's Have It

TEACHERS: See the Reading and Writing Connection that accompanies today's lesson on flight formation.

Journey North is pleased to feature this educational adventure presented in cooperation with the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP).
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