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Eastern Flock Chicks: Hatch Year 2010
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Group 1

Learn to migrate
by following ultralight airplanes

Group 1 chicks are captive-born.

Crane chick #1-10
Crane #1-10
(M)
Crane chick #3-10
Crane #3-10
(F)
(Presumed dead, 2013)

Crane chick #6-10
Crane #6-10
(F)

(died June, 2012)

Crane chick #9-10
Crane #9-10
(F)
(died Apr, 2013)

Crane chick #15-10
Crane #15-10
(M)
(died Aug., 2011)

Crane chick #16-10
Crane #16-10
(F)
(Presumed dead, 2013)

Crane chick #17-10
Crane #17-10 (M)
(Died July, 2013)

   
Above Photos: Operation Migration
Group 2

Learn to migrate by following older cranes in the flock

Group 2 chicks are also captive-born. In fall the chicks are released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route in a program called
Direct Autumn Release (DAR)
.

On July 20, the 11 chicks for Direct Autumn Release (DAR) arrived at Necedah NWR from nearby International Crane Foundation (ICF). They were released Oct. 25 with wild cranes.

DAR #18-10
DAR #18-10 (M)
(died Oct. 30, 2010, before migration)
DAR #20-10
DAR #20-10 (M)
(died Dec., 2010)
DAR #21-10
DAR #21-10
(M) (died Feb., 2013)

DAR #22-10
DAR #22-10 (F)
(died Jan., 2011)

DAR #24-10
DAR #24
-10
(died Dec., 2010)
DAR #28-10
DAR #28
-10 (M)
(died Dec., 2010)
Above Photos: International Crane Foundation
Group 3 (W = wild hatched)

Learn to migrate by following their parents

Group 3 chicks are wild-born. Their parents raise them and teach them to migrate. This is the natural way cranes learn to migrate. One day, this flock will be large enough for wild-born parents to take over. Then human-assisted migration will no longer be needed.

Parents #309 and #403 with chick W1-10 on July 7, 2010. Seven chicks hatched in 2010 in the Wisconsin wild. This was the largest number to hatch in the new flock's history. Wild-hatched chicks face many dangers in the first weeks of their lives, and by summer's end only W1-10 and W3-10 survived.They were flying by the end of August and better able to escape predators.
#309 & #403 with new chick W1-10 (F)
(died Nov., 2013)
Photo Operation Migration
Parents #212 and #419 with chick W3-10 on Aug. 30, 2010.
#212 & #419 with chick W3-10 (F)
on Aug. 30, 2010.
Photo Eva Szyszkoski, ICF
 
 
 

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