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Eastern Flock Chicks: Hatch Year 2007
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2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Group 1

Learn to migrate
by following ultralight airplanes

Group 1 chicks are captive-born.

Whooping CraneCrane #703
(missing/presumed dead, Jan. 2013)

Whooping CraneCrane #706
(missing/ presumed dead, 2010)

Whooping CraneCrane #707

Whooping CraneCrane #709
(died 5/10)

Whooping CraneCrane #710
(removed to captivity 6/3/09)

Whooping CraneCrane #712
(missing /presumed dead, Mar. 2014)

Whooping CraneCrane #713
(missing /presumed dead, Feb. 2012)

Whooping CraneCrane #714
(died 3/30/08)

Whooping CraneCrane #716

Whooping CraneCrane #717

Whooping CraneCrane #721
(died 12/08)

Whooping Crane
Crane #722
(Removed 12/2013)

Whooping CraneCrane #724
(missing/presumed dead, 2010)

Whooping CraneCrane #726

Whooping CraneCrane #727

Whooping CraneCrane #733
(died 12/13)

Whooping CraneCrane #735
(Removed 7/2008)

Photos: WCEP

Group 2

Learn to migrate by following older cranes in the flock

Group 2 chicks are also captive-born. They are released and follow older cranes in a program called
Direct Autumn Release (DAR)
.

Whooping Crane
DAR #36-07
(died 11/4/07)

Whooping Crane
DAR #37-07
Whooping Crane
DAR #39-07

Whooping Crane
DAR #40-07
(died winter 2009)

Whooping Crane
DAR #41-07
(died 10/31/07)

Whooping Crane
DAR #42-07
(died spring 2011)

Whooping Crane
DAR #43-07
(died 3/22/08)
Whooping Crane
DAR #44-07
(missing /presumed dead, 2010)

Whooping Crane
DAR #46-07
(died August, 2012)

 

DAR Photos:
Danielle Desourdis, USFWS Intern
Anna Fasoli, ICF

  DAR #45-07
died after release but before migration.
Group 3

Learn to migrate by following their parents

Group 3 chicks are wild-born. Their parents raise them and teach them to migrate. This is the natural way cranes learn to migrate. One day, the flock will be large enough for wild-born parents to take over and human assisted migration will no longer be needed. Scientists hope to reach their goal of 125 birds by 2020.

Zero wild-born chicks hatched in summer 2007. 
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