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Hummingbird Update: February 8, 2012
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Your Sightings!
Report Your Sightings
Welcome to Journey North's 19th season! We will be tracking the spring migration of the ruby-throated and rufous hummingbirds on their journey north this spring. Plus, we will be collecting your sightings of the other species found in North America. Meet and get to know our hummingbirds.

This Week's Update Includes:

Image of the Week
Students Receive Symbolic Monarchs in Mexico
 
Seeing Hummers?
News: Winter Hummingbird Sightings
While we wait and watch the maps for the start of the spring migration, it is interesting to note where overwintering birds have been reported in this in-between season. You can see all the winter sightings, but here are just a few selections:

02/02/12 Ormond Beach, Florida
My three overwintering hummingbirds continue to suck dry the feeders. Babygirl, the hummingbird who is here for her 6th winter continues to come down to me when I call her and chats up a storm with me. The other two sneak in and out.

02/05/12 San Antonio, Texas
I was pleasantly surprised to see a female ruby throat hummingbird visiting our indigio spires and shrimp plant. This is the earliest I have seen a hummingbird here.

02/01/12 Sharpsburg, Maryland
One immature female banded rufous still here today! (*note: this rufous has been sited in this area since January.)

01/20/12 Knoxville, Tennessee
Our rufous hummingbird is still with us. So far she has stayed all winter.

11/12/11- 01/23/12 Tinton Falls, New Jersey
A hummer identified as juvenile female Rufous or Allens has been hanging around our feeder no matter what kind of crazy weather we're having this winter.

01/28/12 Rialto, California
I have 11 hummingbirds that have not left all winter.

 

early December, Alexander City, AL
Photo: Tracy Thomas
A banded immature male rufous ready for release.
 
humm in NJ
Photo: Bob Fullerton
A Rufous/Allens female is in New Jersey this winter.
Activity: Mapping Species Distribution
There are over 300 different species of hummingbirds in the world. Learn about the fifteen species commonly found in North America. Examine data and create a species distribution map to explore this question:

"Where in North America are different species found?"

species map
Mapping Activity
Latest Maps: Who's Seeing Hummingbirds?
All hummingbirds do not go to Central America in the winter. Please help us document where hummingbirds are located this winter!
ruby map ruby map ruby map
Ruby-throated
(map | animation | sightings)
Rufous
(map | animation | sightings)
Other
(map | animation | sightings)
Report Your Sightings!
Male and Female Rubythroat male and female rufous collage
Ruby-throated
Rufous
Other Species
The next Hummingbird Migration Update will be posted on February 22, 2012.
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