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Whooping Crane Migration Update: March 28, 2008

Today's Report Includes:

  • The Migration : Map, Data and Highlights >>
  • Field Reports: Both Flocks Underway! >>
  • Journal Questions: A Bird of Firsts: Which Whooper? >>
  • Links: This Week's Crane Resources >>

Who's the boss here?
Photo Eva Szyszkoski

The Migration: Maps, Data and Highlights
Maps and Data

Western and Eastern >>
Flocks

For the Classroom

Eastern Flock

  • Migration Data >>
  • Arrival log >>
  • Departure and Arrival log >>

Western Flock

  • Migration Data >>
  • Departure Log >>

Eastern Flock >>
1st year chicks only

Highlights

Western Flock: Backed by favorable winds, the first five of the 266 Whooping Cranes at Aransas (say Uh RAN Zus) left on migration March 25!

Eastern Flock: Six of the seventeen ultralight-led Whooping Cranes began their first spring migration north March 25 from Florida's Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge ("Chass"). The next day, five more left. Only six birds of the ultralight-led cohort remain at their Florida release pen. Will they find their way back to Wisconsin? When will they arrive? Some of the new flock's older cranes are already home!

  • Departure and Arrival Logs: Keep track of the cranes with the departure and arrival logs for both flocks at the links above.
Field Reports: Both Flocks Underway!


Young #710 and #722 at their first migration stopover March 25. Describe the type of habitat they chose.

Photo Richard Urbanek, ICF

Read >>
Tom Stehn's report

Read >>
Sara and Eva's reports

Western Flock Report: Biologist Tom Stehn spins a story of an exciting day: March 25. He also shares news you'll be glad to hear about Daddy Lobstick, the natural flock's oldest crane of known age. >>

Eastern Flock Report: New photos from Sara Zimorski, ICF Aviculturist and WCEP Winter Management Team Leader, reveal some shenanigans of the juveniles at the Florida pen site. Tracking intern Eva also spills the beans about #706. Is he the Boss — or Mommy's Little Boy? >>

 

Journal Question: A Bird of Firsts: Which Whooper?

The first crane from the first year of the reintroduction was the first of the Eastern flock to arrive home in spring 2008! Which bird? (Hint: Remember how the Eastern birds are numbered?) Visit this bio page to answer:

  • In how many days did this crane complete his spring migration? (Scroll way down to "Spring 2008.") On what dates did he return in past springs?
  • Why is he alone? (See "Spring 2007.")
  • What are two or more things you think are really interesting about this bird?

Write your responses in your Journal. >>


The "First" Bird wears bands of green/red/green on the right leg.
This Week's Crane Resources
  • Ask the Expert: Send questions! Ends April 4 >>
  • Understand: How Whooping Cranes Fly >>
  • Explore: Up, Up and Away: Thermals and Updrafts >>
  • Discover: Feeling Blue and Crabby: Whooping Crane Winter Diet >>
  • Review: The Lobstick Male: Crane Extraordinaire >>
  • Write: Whooping Crane Migration Journals (click-and-print) >>
A Good Day to Migrate!
What are the best weather conditions for crane migration? Find Out Here! >>
More Whooping Crane Lessons and Teaching Ideas!

The Next Whooping Crane Migration Update Will Be Posted on April 4, 2008.

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