Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Adapting and Modifying Sources

This activity demonstrates the range of ways that a primary source can be adapted and modified for students at different grade levels and reading levels.

American Passages Archive

Access more than 3000 items including visual art, audio files, primary source materials and additional texts supporting and enriching the understanding of American Literature.

Analyzing a Lesson

Examine how elements of teaching for understanding are incorporated in a lesson. Enter your examples of how the element is used in the lesson, and then compare your answers to other teachers’ answers.

Analyzing Artifacts

Analyze historical artifacts by applying the same methods historians use to evaluate everyday items - from dishes, to clothing, to weapons - and consider what that data can tell you about the past.

Approaches in Practice: Treating Psychological Disorders

Explore the contemporary approaches used to understand, treat and prevent psychological disorders. Learn about these approaches and then put each into practice with a patient.

Assessing Student Letters

Assess two drafts of students’ letters using criteria presented as a four-point-scale rubric.

Balancing Sources

Review primary sources that examine historical events. Choose several sources that represent different perspectives of the era and create a narrative that represents a balanced view.

Bridging World History Archive

View more than 1500 items, including photos, documents, maps, and other items, ready for your research and classroom use. Browse by unit title, region, and/or time period.

Connecting Themes and Disciplines

Connect themes and content to teaching strategies and activities. Practice developing lesson ideas by listing new concepts you would teach and activities you would use to teach them.

Curating an Exhibit

Curate a museum exhibit centered on the theme of "Conflicts in American History." Select artifacts, letters, paintings and other items, and then write descriptions of the items that tie them to the larger theme. View and print final compiled exhibit.

Elements of Authentic Instruction

Analyze three classroom segments and identify teaching strategies that illustrate authentic instruction. Give examples to support your answer and compare your answers to those of other teachers.

Evaluating Evidence

Evaluate primary sources to determine their support of a given thesis. Using the Civil War as an example, rank the relevancy of sources in relation to four common beliefs as to the cause of the war.

Experiencing Discipline-Specific Texts

This activity features a short text related to the topic of economics in each of the four disciplines — science, mathematics, English, and history — with questions to assess learning about each text. The goal is to experience the different text types and specialized literacy practices required to make sense of the ideas presented, which students must do each school day.

Images as History: Depression Era Photography

This image of a steer skull seems straightforward, but it generated enormous controversy at the time. Can you imagine why? Hint: It was taken to document the hardships Americans suffered during the Depression. View non-Flash version.

Making Connections in Your Teaching

Connect teaching goals with strategies that enhance learning. Select teaching goals, review the tips provided, then brainstorm and list strategies you would use to help students make connections. Compare your answers to other teachers' answers.

Placing Artifacts in Time

This interactive focuses on the concept of Chronological Thinking. Using the example of Pocahontas, explore how historical representations change over time, and often reflect the period in which the representation was created.

Powerful Teaching and Learning

Read the description of each segment, then identify up to three elements of powerful teaching and learning best represented in the segment. Once you've identified the elements, explain your answers.

Reading Maps

Learn the visual language of maps (perspective, symbols and data) and see how mapping techniques have changed over time. Practice looking at maps as historical artifacts.

Unity and Diversity

Analyze teaching strategies used in four classroom examples. Describe how the teachers incorporated themes of unity and diversity into their lessons and compare your answers to the sample answers provided.

Using Artifacts

View an engraving and two photographs from U.S. history. As you view these resources, think about what you can identify and interpret through the images, and what kinds of questions you might generate if you were using these images to teach your students.

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