Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU
x
x
Unit Home
x
Unit Content Overview
x
Readings
x
References & Sources
x
Unit Audio Glossary
x
Related Units
x
x

UNIT 12: Transmission of Traditions

x

VIDEO SEGMENT: Islamic Spain

This segment examines the influence of Islamic traditions in the Iberian Peninsula between the eighth and fifteenth centuries. Islam came to the region through conquest by Arab and Berber armies. After conquest, Islamic influence was spread through military might, intermarriage between conquerors and indigenous peoples, and immigrant Muslims who brought their culture, learning, and traditions with them.

In the city of Cordoba, for example, immigrant Islamic leaders built mosques and gardens planted with imports from the Islamic world. Pilgrims from Spain traveled to Muslim holy sites, and both migrants and travelers from the Islamic world traveled to Spain. In each case, such people spread Islamic learning and ideas throughout the Iberian Peninsula.

Aided by the technology of paper manufacturing, Arabic poetry and music became increasingly popular, and deeply influenced musical styles in the region. Non-Muslims, including both Jews and Christians, also encouraged the spread of Islamic culture by translating Arabic works into European languages — including some of the most important scientific texts of the era.

However, by the late eleventh century, small Christian communities who had resisted Islamic conquest began the reconquista — the Christian reconquest of Spain. The reconquest took 500 years to accomplish, and in 1492 the last of the Muslims were expelled from the Iberian Peninsula. Even so, in both language and culture, Islamic traditions continue to be visible in Spain today.

SELECTED IMAGES AND MAPS


Nasrid, COURTYARD OF ALHAMBRA PALACE, CORDOBA, SPAIN (n.d.). Courtesy of WorldArt Kiosk/Kathleen Cohen.

Anonymous Umayyad, PAGE FROM A MANUSCRIPT OF THE QUR'AN, SPAIN (c. 1100-1200). Courtesy of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.


Anonymous, GARDEN OF THE ALCAZAR, CORDOBA (n.d.). Copyright 2003 Oregon Public Broadcasting and its licensors. All rights reserved.

Hot Pepper Studios, created for Bridging World History, MAP OF ISLAMIC SPAIN OR AL-ANDALUS, 8TH CENTURY (2004). Courtesy of Oregon Public Broadcasting.



x
x
  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us  |     Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook 
  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy