Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU
x
x
Unit Home
x
Unit Content Overview
x
Readings
x
References & Sources
x
Unit Audio Glossary
x
Related Units
x
x

UNIT 10: Connections Across Water

x

VIDEO SEGMENT: The Indian Ocean World

This segment explores the thriving trade that developed between lands adjoining the Indian Ocean as early as the third millennium BCE. Crucial to the navigation of the Indian Ocean was learning to navigate using the monsoon winds. In summer, the winds carried merchants east from Africa and Arabia to India; in winter, the winds brought merchants back the other way.

Over the centuries, both the volume and variety of trade goods expanded dramatically in the Indian Ocean region, which gave rise to numerous port cities and enriched state leaders. Also, while early Indian Ocean voyages tended to be long-distance affairs, by the eleventh century such voyages were replaced by much shorter voyages that created a series of overlapping trade zones centered around the Arabian Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the South China Sea. Chinese mariners grew particularly strong in the South China Sea between the second century BCE and the fifteenth century CE. Other traders plied the waters of the Indian Ocean, including Indian, Persian, and African mariners.

One group that proved to be particularly successful was the Swahili, who emerged on the East African coast in the eighth century CE. The Swahili developed their distinctiveness from extensive interactions with Islamic traders, who came in search of gold, ivory, and slaves. Soon, Swahili rulers adopted Islam, absorbed Arabic words into their language, and imitated Arabic architectural styles. They grew wealthy from controlling and taxing the trade that came from inland states like Great Zimbabwe through Swahili port cities. In such ways, trading relationships in the Indian Ocean both encouraged connections between distant peoples and strengthened participating ports and states.

SELECTED IMAGES AND MAPS


Anonymous, COMMERCIAL TRADING SHIP & GODDESS SEQUINOS (550 BCE). Courtesy of WorldArt Kiosk.

Anonymous, SAID BARGASH, SULTAN OF ZANZIBAR (n.d.). Courtesy of Torrence Royer.


Anonymous Chinese, CHINESE SHIP DESIGN (n.d.). Courtesy of East Asian History of Science Library, Needham Research Institute.

Hot Pepper Studios, created for Bridging World History, INDIAN OCEAN TRADE ROUTES (2004). Courtesy of Oregon Public Broadcasting.



x
x
  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us  |     Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook 
  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy