Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU
x
x
Unit Home
x
Unit Content Overview
x
Readings
x
References & Sources
x
Unit Audio Glossary
x
Related Units
x
x

UNIT 4: Agricultural and Urban Revolutions

x

PERSPECTIVES ON THE PAST

Back

Transcript of Audio Clip

Steve Weber, Ethnobotanist

Our knowledge of world prehistory is increasing constantly. New discoveries and a better understanding of our past are made possible by new techniques in the practice of archaeology. Archaeological fieldwork today is so refined that what WE tossed away in the past is now valuable information. In the past, archaeologists did not collect pollen, seeds or animal bones; nobody knew that these could be used to reconstruct the environment or diet. Today, we use of satellite imagery, ground penetrating radar or even the analysis of ancient DNA are common practice in archaeology. In the 1960s, archaeologists at atalhyk uncovered over 200 rooms in less than 4 years, current excavations at this site expose only 1 to 2 houses per year. We now realize that there is so much more information to obtain from each room. Still, we will never learn all there is to know about the past. Archaeological techniques will continually improve. For this reason, we must preserve part of the past for future archaeologists, equipped with those improved techniques, to uncover.



x
x
  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us  |     Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook 
  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy