Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU
x
x
Unit Home
x
Unit Content Overview
x
Readings
x
References & Sources
x
Unit Audio Glossary
x
Related Units
x
x

UNIT 26: World History and Identity

x

READINGS

Reading 1

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, In the Balance: Themes in World History (Boston: Mc-Graw-Hill, 1998). Selections from chapter 20, "The Crossroads of History: Culture, Identity, and Global Community."

Abstract: The material bases of human cultures (including technology, environment, and demographics) and the resulting changes in the way people understand the world provide the sources of individual as well as community, national, or even global identity. This essay focuses on how accelerated change has affected issues such as ethnicity, race, class, and gender in the lives of individuals and communities.

Download PDF »


Reading 2

Adam McKeown, "Global Migration, 1846–1970," Journal of World History 15, no. 2 (June 2004) 155–89.

Abstract: European migrations to the Americas and Australia have often been noted as an important part of world history, but movements to the frontiers, factories, and cities of Asia and Africa have largely been overlooked. This paper will show that migrations to northern and southeastern Asia were comparable in size and demographic impact to the transatlantic ?ows and followed similar cycles of growth and contraction. These migrations were all part of an expanding world economy, and a global perspective suggests ways in which that economy extended beyond direct European intervention. A global perspective also compels us to extend the traditional ending point for the era of mass migration from 1914 to 1930, and to be more aware of how political intervention has shaped the world into different migration systems and led scholars to wrongly assume that these systems re?ect categorically different kinds of migration.

Download PDF »


Reading 3

Robert Strayer, "Decolonization, Democratization, and Communist Reform: The Soviet Collapse in Comparative Perspective," Journal of World History 12, no. 2 (Fall 2001): 375–406.

Abstract: This article seeks to situate the collapse of the Soviet Union in a set of broader comparative contexts, each of which illuminates particular aspects of late Soviet history. It treats that history first as an end-of-empire story, comparing it with other disintegrating empires of the twentieth century, then as a democratization narrative juxtaposed to those of other authoritarian regimes in southern Europe, Latin America, Africa, and east Asia over the past three decades, and finally as a communist reform process gone awry, comparing it to an analogous and apparently more successful process in China.

Download PDF »



x
x
  Home  |  Catalog  |  About Us  |  Search  |  Contact Us  |     Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook 
  © Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy