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UNIT 16: Food, Demographics, and Culture

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READINGS

Reading 1

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, "Crucibles of Change: Landscapes, Material Culture, and Social Life after 1500," in In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998), 656–64.

Abstract: This essay explores the ways in which cultural transformations were expressed on the human body. In particular, it focuses on the outward appearance of bodies—scarification, tattooing, and dress—as well as on patterns of consumption for foods and drinks such as tea, potatoes, and chocolate. In each case, it explores patterns of similarities and difference across time and space, and highlights changes that resulted from cultural interaction.

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Reading 2

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, "Cultural Creativity and Borrowed Art," in In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998), color photo essay.

Abstract: This essay explores the effects of global trade in terms of art. In the years after 1500, global connections introduced new artistic ideas and objects into a variety of societies. This resulted in a demand for foreign art around the world. This global art market, in turn, influenced both producers and consumers from China to the Americas, and from Europe to Africa.

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Reading 3

Candice Goucher, Charles LeGuin, and Linda Walton, "My Dinner with Attila the Hun," in In the Balance: Themes in Global History (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998), 341.

Abstract: This essay explores the complex cultural meanings associated with food etiquette, and the ways those meaning vary between cultures. It uses an account by the Roman Priscus detailing his dinner with Attila the Hun to demonstrate this point, for Priscus paid close attention to the unique aspects of his host's dining etiquette. Such accounts give historians a sense of the variety of ways humans have historically shared food.

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