Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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WORLD HISTORY TRAVELER

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ACTIVITIES

For a more guided experience through the World History Traveler, select an Activity from the list. Each Activity asks you to select and download Resources in response to research assignments.

Launch the Traveler Interactive »

Download a printable version of the Traveler activities (pdf) »



Tools of Empire

Learning Objective:

Determine how the nineteenth and twentieth centuries show methods of expansion and control for the imperialist powers.

Use the Tools of Empire bridge screens to collect information on the transportation and communication tools used by the imperialist powers in the nineteenth and twentieth- centuries. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How are the transportation technologies examples of methods of expansion?
  • How are the communication technologies examples of methods of control?
  • How are the transportation and communication technologies related to each other? Did one type of technology have to develop before the other?
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Technology and Culture: Before 1500

Learning Objective:

Identify examples of the role of technology in human adaptation to different environments.

Use the Technology and Culture: Before 1500 bridge screens to collect information on the role of technology in human adaptation to different environments. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • When and where did humans adapt to different environments before 1500?
  • When and where did humans cause major changes to environments before 1500?
  • What are some examples of technologies becoming parts of human cultures? Compare the cultural values placed on camels, horses, harbors, irrigation systems, and maritime technologies.
  • As humans migrated, they often carried "tool kits" with them. What are some examples of migrants taking tool kits to other environments? In what ways did the items in the tool kits become embedded in the cultures where the migrants settled?
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Technology and Culture: After 1500

Learning Objective:

Compare the benefits and disadvantages of technology after 1500.

Use the Technology and Culture: After 1500 bridge screens to collect information on the benefits and disadvantages of technology after 1500. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How did technology positively affect human abilities to produce food?
  • How did technology negatively affect human traditional economies?
  • In what ways did humans use technology to adapt to environments changed by the Columbian Exchange?
  • To what extent did modern scientific technology provide solutions to human-created problems?
  • What are some examples of historians using cuisine as a way to measure the effects of adaptations to the environment?
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Population and Disease

Learning Objectives:

Trace the origins of disease and animal domestication over time.

Identify the impacts of trade and migration on the spread of disease and the relationship between expanding population and disease.

Use the Population and Disease bridge screens to collect information on the connections between trade, migrations, disease, and demographics. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How did diseases develop from the domestication of animals?
  • How did developments in transportation technologies for trade or conquest affect the spread of diseases over time?
  • When did expanding populations cause the development of disease in dense urban areas? When did the voluntary or forced migrations of peoples lead to the spread of diseases?
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Early Religious Encounters

Learning Objective:

Compare the spread of religions.

Use the Early Religious Encounters bridge screens to collect information on the spread of religions. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How did religions spread along trade routes?
  • How did the spread of religions lead to accommodations or conflicts with established belief systems?
  • In what ways did the spread of religions affect political systems?
  • To what extent were missionaries responsible for the spread of religions in the early time periods?
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Later Religious Encounters

Learning Objective:

Analyze who or what changed as a result of encounters among peoples of different belief systems.

Use the Later Religious Encounters bridge screens to collect information on the changes that resulted from religious encounters. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How typical was the Muslim ruler Akbar in creating religious dialogue during his reign?
  • How did the later Mughal rulers differ from Akbar?
  • In what ways did the actions of Christian missionaries precipitate new religious movements in China and New Zealand?
  • To what extent was intolerance more common in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries?
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Religion, Community, and State

Learning Objective:

Identify how rulers used belief systems to maintain and extend their power.

Use the Religion, Community, and State bridge screens to collect information on the relationships between religion, community, and the state. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How did rulers use belief systems to spiritually legitimize their positions?
  • How did rulers use belief systems to unite people?
  • In what ways did rulers use religious messages on coins to impose order on their economies?
  • How did rulers use religious symbols to link them to religions imported from elsewhere?
  • Does the evidence in the screens adequately answer the questions? What other kinds of evidence would help you prove or disprove the assertion that rulers used belief systems to maintain and extend their power?
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Order and Resistance

Learning Objective:

Compare forms of resistance to states imposing order on communities.

Use the Order and Resistance bridge screens to collect information on the pairs of examples by each form of resistance and its effectiveness. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How do the pairs show similarities?
  • How do the pairs show differences?
  • Who changed the most as a result of the resistance -- those who resisted or those who had power?
  • To what extent were assimilators better able to resist some aspects of the dominant cultures?
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Ideology and Political Order

Learning Objective:

Compare the ways that ideology was used in different political systems to maintain political order.

Use the Ideology and Political Order bridge screens to collect information on the ways that ideology was used in different political systems to maintain political order. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • How was ideology used to sanction the exercise of power?
  • How were new ideologies absorbed or changed by ruling elites?
  • In what ways were the ruling elites challenged by new ideas about political structures?
  • To what extent were traditional ideas about political systems altered to fit new conditions?
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Family and Kinship

Learning Objective:

Compare the definitions of family and kinship across time and space.

Use the Family and Kinship bridge screens to collect information on the definitions of family and kinship. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • Who was accepted as family and deserving of protection and support? Why were family relationships defined in that way?
  • Who was excluded from the family or lineage? Why were those types of people excluded?
  • What other types of kinship ties were important in some societies? Why?
  • In what ways did nomadic groups share similar family definitions?
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Women in World History

Learning Objective:

Identify the roles women played as rulers, writers, and agents of change.

Use the Women in World History bridge screens to collect information on the roles women played as rulers, writers, and agents of change. Review and gather evidence from the bridge screens (narratives, artifacts, maps, etc.) to support your answers to the following questions:

  • When and where were women accepted as rulers? Did their gender affect how they ruled? In what cases were women rulers rejected because of their gender?
  • When and where were women active as writers before 1900? Did their gender affect what they wrote?
  • In what ways did images of women in the twentieth century affect the public views of women? Trace the views of Eva Peron over the twentieth-century. Find some movie reviews of Madonna playing the role of Eva in the film Evita. How did public beliefs about the power of ruler's wives like Eva Peron affect how critics saw Madonna's acting?
  • Were calypso songs that reflected some popular reactions against women's increasing public roles in the twentieth century typical? What other examples of negative reactions against women's empowerment in the twentieth-century can you find?
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