Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Problem SolvingSession 03 OverviewTab atab btab ctab dtab eReference
Part A

Observing Student Problem Solving
  Introduction | Making "Ominos" | Student Work | Questions and Answers | Student Work Reflection | Observe a Classroom | Classroom Practice | Your Journal

 
 

Following are some examples of questions you might ask these students. For each question, think about how the student might respond, then select "Show Answer" to see an answer that a student might give.


Teacher: How do you know which hexominos will make a cube?

Show Answer
Student:
I cut them out and folded them up. Some of them made a cube with all six sides. Some of them overlapped on some sides and left other sides missing. (Note: Some students might visualize folding the hexominos into three-dimensional cubes, and others might actually cut them out and fold them up.)
 

Teacher: Are there other strategies you can use to find cubes?

Show Answer
Student:
I did it in my head.
 

Teacher: Explain to me how you know if a hexomino will make a cube or not.

Show Answer
Student:
I can see that these four in the center form the sides of the cube, and the square on top can be folded over to make the top of the box. The square on the bottom can be folded over to make the bottom of the box.
 

Teacher: Did you use any other strategies?

Show Answer
Student:
I first tried to figure out which square was the bottom, and then I folded the rest of the squares to see if they made a cube.
 

Teacher: There are some hexominos that you have not included in your solution. How can you decide whether they will make a cube?

Show Answer
Student:
We need to find the ones we didn't include, and cut and fold them up.
 

Teacher: What do the hexominos that will make a cube have in common?

Show Answer
Student:
All of the ones with four squares in a row and a square on opposite sides will form a cube.
 

Teacher: What do the hexominos that will not make a cube have in common?

Show Answer
Student:
They do not have at least one square on the top and one square on the bottom of the main row –– so the box will not have a top and a bottom.
 

Teacher: What is an example of something new you learned from this activity?

Show Answer
Student:
Even though all hexominos have six faces, they do not all make cubes.
 

next  Reflect on the student work

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