Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU

Change and Resistance

Civil Rights Movements Across the Nation

Standards

National History Standard (NCHS)

U.S. History Era 9, Standard 4: The struggle for racial and gender equality and for the extension of civil liberties.

U.S. History Era 9, Standard 4A: The student understands the “Second Reconstruction” and its advancement of civil rights.

U.S. History Era 9, Standard 4B: The student understands the women’s movement for civil rights and equal opportunities.

Common Core

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5: Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6: Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9: Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (e.g., Washington's Farewell Address, the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt's Four Freedoms speech, King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail").

Grade Level

High School

Classroom Connections

English Language Arts
Literature
Social Studies
U.S. History

Curriculum Snapshot

  • School integration and the demand for educational reform: Little Rock, Boston, and Los Angeles
  • Voices of change and the use of argument: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, Malcolm X’s The Ballot or the Bullet speech, the National Organization for Women’s Statement of Purpose, and the Alcatraz Red Power Movement’s Alcatraz Proclamation

Video Connection

Witness

Downloads

To download this collection, you must agree to the following terms:

Photos downloaded from the Essential Lens site are cleared for educational use only.

I Agree

Collection PDF (large)
Collection PDF (small)

All Collection Photographs

© Annenberg Foundation 2015. All rights reserved. Legal Policy