Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
MENU
Learning Math Home
Measurement Session 1, Part B: Which Rock Is the Largest?
 
Session 1 Part A Part B Part C Part D Homework
 
Glossary
measurement Site Map
Session 1 Materials:
Notes
Solutions
Video

Session 1, Part B:
Which Rock Is the Largest?

In This Part: Measuring Surface Area | Measuring Volume | Measuring Weight

Some people might suggest that we examine the weight of rocks to determine which is the biggest. To measure the weight of your rock, you will need a two-pan balance and a three-arm balance. Note 7

Two-Pan Balance

Three-Arm Balance

Estimate the weight of your rock. (Later, you can compare your estimate with the approximate weight you've measured.)

Problem B7

Solution  

What information can you gather by using a two-pan balance? Can you determine the weight of your rock with this balance? Note 8

If you have access to a two-pan balance, use it to determine the weight of your rock.


 

Problem B8

Solution  

How does a three-arm balance scale work? Can you determine the weight of your rock with this balance?

If you have access to a three-arm balance, use it to determine the weight of your rock.


 

Problem B9

Solution  

In science, a distinction is made between mass and weight. What do you know about these two terms?


 

Problem B10

Solution  

How precise are your rock's measurements? What might affect the precision of this measurement?


 

Problem B11

Solution  

Now that you've experimented with several different types of measures, which would you use to determine the largest rock in a group of rocks? Should you use a combination of measures? Note 9


Take it Further

Problem B12

Solution

There are very interesting relationships among metric measures involving water. One cubic centimeter of water is equivalent to 1 mL of water. In addition, 1 mL of water (or 1 cm3 of water) weighs 1 g. You may then conclude that the amount of water your rock displaced should be equivalent to the weight of your rock. What is faulty about this line of reasoning?


Is the rock heavier, lighter, or the same weight as water?   Close Tip
 

 

Problem B13

Solution  

Are there any other measurements you could use to determine the largest rock in a group of rocks?


Next > Part C: Nonstandard Units

Learning Math Home | Measurement Home | Glossary | Map | ©

Session 1: Index | Notes | Solutions | Video

Home | Catalog | About Us | Search | Contact Us | Site Map

  • Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook

© Annenberg Foundation 2013. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy