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Learning Math Home
Data Session 7, Part C: Modeling Linear Relationships
 
Session 7 Part A Part B Part C Part D Homework
 
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Session 7 Materials:
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Session 7, Part C:
Modeling Linear Relationships

In This Part: How Square Can You Be? | Analyzing the Differences | Using a Scatter Plot

Here again is the data table for the 24 people we have been studying -- but it now includes a column to show the difference between height and arm span for each person:

#

Arm Span

Height

Height - Arm Span

1

156

162

6

2

157

160

3

3

159

162

3

4

160

155

-5

5

161

160

-1

6

161

162

1

7

162

170

8

8

165

166

1

9

170

170

0

10

170

167

-3

11

173

185

12

12

173

176

3

 

#

Arm Span

Height

Height - Arm Span

13

177

173

-4

14

177

176

-1

15

178

178

0

16

184

180

-4

17

188

188

0

18

188

187

-1

19

188

182

-6

20

188

181

-7

21

188

192

4

22

194

193

-1

23

196

184

-12

24

200

186

-14

Problem C4

Solution  

Let's consider five of the people we have studied: Persons 1, 6, 9, 14, and 19. Use the table to determine the following:

a. 

Which of the five people have heights that are greater than their arm spans?

b. 

Which of the five people have heights that are less than their arm spans?

c. 

Which of the five has the greatest difference between height and arm span?

d. 

Which of the five has the smallest difference between height and arm span?


 

Problem C5

Solution  

Use the table to determine the following:

a. 

How many of the 24 people have heights that are greater than their arm spans?

b. 

How many of the 24 people have heights that are less than their arm spans?

c. 

How many of the 24 people have heights that are equal to their arm spans?

d. 

Which six people are the closest to being square without being perfectly square?

e. 

Which five are the farthest from being square?


 

Problem C6

Solution  

a. 

How many of the 24 people have heights and arm spans that differ by more than 6 cm?

b. 

How many people have heights and arm spans that differ by less than 3 cm?


Next > Part C (Continued): Using a Scatter Plot

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