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Learning Math Home
Session 2, Part C: Frequency Tables
 
Session 2 Part A Part B Part C Part D Part E Homework
 
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Session 2, Part C:
Frequency Tables (40 minutes)

In This Part: Making a Table | Cumulative Frequencies | Another Method
Intervals and Ranges

As you saw in Part A, a line plot is a graphical representation of data. For the raisin-count data, it showed how many times each raisin count occurred among the 17 boxes of Brand X raisins. You can also describe the same data using a frequency table, which shows the number of times each value occurs. The frequency table contains the same information as the line plot, but in tabular rather than graphical form. Note 6

Problem C1

  

Use the line plot to complete the frequency table for the Brand X raisin counts. The first column lists each of the values that occurred in the raisin counts. The corresponding cell in the second column indicates the frequency -- the number of times that that value occurred. For instance, only one box contained 25 raisins, so the frequency of 25 is 1.

2c1

Raisin Count

Frequency

25

1

26

27

28

29

30

31

show answers

Raisin Count

Frequency

25

1

26

2

27

3

28

5

29

4

30

1

31

1


hide answers


 

Problem C2

Solution  

Use the frequency table to answer the following questions:

a. 

What is the minimum (smallest) raisin count for a box of Brand X raisins?

b. 

What is the maximum (largest) raisin count for a box?

c. 

How many boxes have between 26 and 28 raisins, inclusively (i.e., including 26 and 28)?

d. 

How many boxes have between 25 and 31 raisins, inclusively (i.e., including 25 and 31)?

e. 

Which raisin count occurred most frequently?

f. 

How many boxes contain more than 29 raisins?

g. 

How many boxes contain 29 or fewer raisins?

h. 

How many boxes contain fewer than 26 raisins?

i. 

How many boxes contain 25 or fewer raisins?

j. 

How many boxes contain between 26 and 29 raisins, inclusively?


 

Problem C3

Solution  

Which questions in Problem C2 were easier to answer with a frequency table than with a line plot? Which were harder?


Next > Part C (Continued): Cumulative Frequencies

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