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Forum: Looking at Learning... Again

Topic: Moon Observations

Topic Posted by: Melissa Cheung
Date Posted: Mon Feb 15 5:09:06 US/Eastern 1999
Topic Description: Has keeping a Moon Journal helped you umderstand the Moon's behavior or has it made it seem more puzzling? Here's a chance for you to pose questions and share insights about your moon observations.

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Original Message:

Posted by: liane ([email protected] )
Date posted: Fri Mar 5 14:43:02 US/Eastern 1999
Subject: moon
Message:
The results show that we really don't know what happens to the moon! We think we notice it, but really don't. One thing I found surprising is that there were hardly any "Don't know" answers! We think we know it all! Does any one know what the moon that is visible during the day is called?


Reply:

Subject: teaching/learning/moon/dark
Reply Posted by: Diane Lonergan ([email protected] )
Organization: Bedford School District - Memorial School
Date Posted: Mon Mar 8 9:25:08 US/Eastern 1999
Message:
This has gotten me thinking about the video clip with Karen. She's convinced eventually she will see in a totally dark room. How many other misconceptions do we all labor under because we were only taught to memorize and/or accept, but not to reason out for ourselves? Eleanor Duckworth's articles begin to address this, as does the discussion on scientific constructivism. Meanwhile, school districts are under pressure to improve scores on standardized tests which reinforce the memorization-without-comprehension route of education. How can educators change the public's mind about what good learning is? Or are our efforts just "seeing in the dark"?


Reply:

Subject: Memorization vs Reasoned Response
Reply Posted by: Carol LeCrone
Date Posted: Wed Mar 10 20:32:34 US/Eastern 1999
Message:
Diane, Perhaps I am playing devil's advocate here, but is Karen's misconception based on her memorization of facts or is she LACKING the basic "facts" to base her reasoned response on? In my own struggle to understand the "teaching to the test" mentality that has been spawned by the rash of high stakes testing -I have had to ask myself if we are being told that giving kids the "tools" (facts) to reason with is more important than taking the time to delve deeply into a limited realm of knowledge. There must be a happy medium between providing the information that others have already discovered and allowing students to discover information on their own? There is a similar dilemma in math - do we spend excessive time in the reasoning of problem solving- and neglect the basic computation and formulas that would enable their processing? I am still wrestling with the conflicting viewpoints. What do you think?


Reply:

Subject: moon
Reply Posted by: Caroline BigTrees
Date Posted: Thu Mar 25 12:56:35 US/Eastern 1999
Message:
Isn't the moon that is visible during the day called a moon shadow? As for the responses to the survey. . . well, what are the correct answers? Let me hazard a guess or two. The observed moon is different in the northern and southern hemispheres. In the northern hemisphere, it goes from "waxing crescent ) to waxing gibbous I) to full moon 0 to waning gibbous (I to waning crescent ( . A new moon is really not visible. Hope my improvised graphics are clear. How do I know this? I do observe the moon every day. But to check my answer, I consulted my Nature Company t-shirt entitled "Phases of the Moon."


Reply:

Subject: N,S hemisphere and phases
Reply Posted by: Carol LeCrone
Date Posted: Sun Mar 28 11:47:14 US/Eastern 1999
Message:
I can't imagine why the view of the moon in space would be different in the two hemispheres- wouldn't the only difference be the relative location in the sky (more southerly or more northerly) based on the tip of the earth, perhaps? Or is the rotation of the moon around the Earth even with the equator? I learned the order of the phases with a mnemonic: the "man in the moon"'s name is DOC - you can always tell whether the moon will be getting larger or smaller depending on the letter it approximates- outward curve full to the right = D, then it will go to full = O, then receed on the right side to leave the full curve on the left = C- then disappear (new moon) before reappearing to spell his name again. The D (waxing) phase will always become visible during day (rising between sunrise and sunset) I think (as the lit portion is closest to the sun), the full moon rises at sunset and sets at sunrise; the C (waning) phase will rise between sunset and sunrise - the fully lit portion being closest to the next appearance of the sun! The new moon then rises with the sun and therefore is not visible (opposite side of the moon is lit and sun is too bright).


Reply:

Subject: Moon
Reply Posted by: mpopa1 ([email protected] )
Date Posted: Tue May 4 16:20:17 US/Eastern 1999
Message:
The moon during the day is called a blue moon due to its color.


Reply:

Subject: blue moon
Reply Posted by: mpopa1 ([email protected] )
Date Posted: Tue May 4 17:09:34 US/Eastern 1999
Message:
Sorry to incorrectly answer your question. Blue moons are two moons in one month, which I'm sure you knew. Still trying to find out what a daytime moon is called.


Reply:

Subject: moon
Reply Posted by: Sharon Pearson
Date Posted: Mon May 7 22:17:31 2001
Message:
It seems the discussion always gets back to the same question--tell or discover? Is there a time to tell? What about the student who will never discover? Will he/she discover another year down the road? How much time is too much time? Is there ever too much time? Is there ever enough time?


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