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American Passages: A Literary SurveyUnit IndexAmerican Passages Home
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5. Masculine Heroes   



16. The Search For Identity

•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
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Activities
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Activities
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Activities: Author Activities


Sandra Cisneros - Selected Archive Items

Back Back to Sandra Cisneros Activities

[6394] José Guadalupe Posada, Altar de la Virgen de Guadalupe (1900),
courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [PGA-anegas, no. 127 (AA size)].
This print, on fuschia ground-wood paper, shows an image of la Virgen de Guadalupe on an altar surrounded by potted plants and candles. In Sandra Cisneros's "Mericans," the narrator visits a Catholic church with her grandmother and describes the "big miracle" of La Virgen de Guadalupe.

[6502] Lorraine Louie, Cover: The House on Mango Street (1984),
courtesy of Random House/Vintage Contemporaries Books.
Sandra Cisneros spent her childhood moving with her parents and six brothers between Chicago and Mexico City. In her most widely read novel, The House on Mango Street, Cisneros draws on this background to explore the experience of growing up in Chicago's Mexican American community.

[6525] Wayne Alaniz Healy and David Rivas Botello, "La Familia" Mural (1977),
courtesy of SPARC (Social and Public Art Resource Center).
This mural shows a Chicano family standing in the center of a starburst, surrounded by images of life in Mexico and in the United States. Many Chicanos and Chicanas have struggled to understand their hybrid identity within the dominant white culture. Sandra Cisneros writes primarily about the experiences of Chicanas growing up in the United States.

[6528] Mario Torero, We are NOT a minority!! (1978),
courtesy of SPARC (Social and Public Art Resource Center).
Mural depicting a billboard. A young Chicano man points at the viewer in the typical "Uncle Sam" recruitment pose, with lettering that reads, "We are NOT a minority!!" Writers, including Gloria Anzaldúa and Sandra Cisneros, strive to give a voice to the Chicano/a experience.

[6638] Dana Tynan, Sandra Cisneros After an Interview (1991),
courtesy of the Associated Press (AP), AP/Wide World Photos.
Sandra Cisneros spent her childhood moving with her parents and six brothers between Chicago and Mexico City. In her most widely read novel, The House on Mango Street, Cisneros draws on this background to explore the experience of growing up in Chicago's Mexican American community.




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