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American Passages: A Literary SurveyUnit IndexAmerican Passages Home
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5. Masculine Heroes   



15. Poetry of Liberation

•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Creative Response

  1. Poet's Corner: Reread Allen Ginsberg's Howl. Think about the values you associate with your generation. How would you describe the current youth culture? What are the defining moments in your generation? Write your own poem in which you strive to define your generation and its place in American culture and identity. If you wish, use Ginsberg's phrase, "I saw the best minds of my generation . . . ," to get you started.

  2. Journal: Imagine that you are Sylvia Plath, but still alive today, and have recently come across some reviews of your work that are sharply critical of your use of Holocaust imagery in poems such as "Lady Lazarus" and "Daddy." How do you respond to such criticism? How do you justify your use of these images? What do you think your poems gain by invoking the Holocaust?

  3. Doing History: Native Americans have preserved their history and heritage for hundreds of years by telling stories and using rituals to create a collective tribal memory. As the language and culture of many tribes threatens to disappear, many Native American writers feel compelled to write down these oral traditions. Using the archive, compare the oral (transcribed) and written histories of removal. How do the versions differ?

  4. Multimedia: You have been asked to speak at a local women's college or high school. Using the archive and the poetry in this unit, develop a slideshow in which you highlight important moments in the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Be sure to leave your audience not only with a sense of how far women have come, but also with an idea of what might come next.



Slideshow Tool
This tool builds multimedia presentations for classrooms or assignments. Go

Archive
An online collection of 3000 artifacts for classroom use. Go

Download PDF
Download the Instructor Guide PDF for this Unit. Go

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