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5. Masculine Heroes   



14. Becoming Visible

•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Author Activities


N. Scott Momaday - Selected Archive Items

Back Back to N. Scott Momaday Activities

[4203] Anonymous, Protest Against the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) (1970),
courtesy of the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection.
Along with the development of contemporary Native American writing in the late 1960s and 1970s, protest movements arose against the discrimination suffered by American Indians.

[5972] Nancy Crampton, N. Scott Momaday Portrait (n.d.),
courtesy of Nancy Crampton.
Momaday (Kiowa) spent most of his childhood on reservations in New Mexico and Arizona, where he was exposed to the rituals and traditions of tribal life, as well as the influence of postwar cultural, unemployment, and alcoholism. Momaday is part of the movement sometimes called the Native American Renaissance.

[5973] Nancy Crampton, N. Scott Momaday 3/4 Shot (n.d.),
courtesy of Nancy Crampton.
Momaday's 1968 House Made of Dawn won the Pulitzer Prize and is seen by some scholars as the beginning of the Native American Renaissance. His work focuses on the power of language and place that helps shape Native American identity.

[8106] Anonymous, Girl's Dress (c. 1890),
courtesy of the Portland Art Museum, gift of Elizabeth Cole Butler.
This hoestôtse, or Cheyenne dress, is made of leather and incorporates glass beadwork. This style was developed by the Kiowa in the mid-1800s and was copied by other Plains tribes.

[8295] N. Scott Momaday, Interview: "Becoming Visible" (2003),
courtesy of American Passages and Annenberg Media.
N. Scott Momaday discusses the relationships among the mythic, the historical, and the personal.

[8861] N. Scott Momaday, Interview: "Becoming Visible" (2003),
courtesy of American Passages and Annenberg Media.
N. Scott Momaday discusses the oral tradition.




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