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American Passages: A Literary SurveyUnit IndexAmerican Passages Home
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5. Masculine Heroes   



14. Becoming Visible

•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Author Activities


N. Scott Momaday - Author Questions

Back Back to N. Scott Momaday Activities
  1. Comprehension: Look carefully at the two-column sections (set in three different typefaces) of The Way to Rainy Mountain. How are we to read them? Simultaneously? One at a time? What does this arrangement suggest about the mind of the writer or the kind of thinking we need to be doing to understand him?

  2. Comprehension: Grandparents played a crucial role in educating and acculturating children. They were important storytellers who communicated Kiowa history, legends, and religion. What role does Momaday's grandmother play in The Way to Rainy Mountain? What are you led to expect when Momaday invokes his grandmother early in his story? What do you find surprising in the way that he develops that part of his account? In House Made of Dawn, what effect does viewing Able through the perspective of Ben Benally in the third section of the book have on your understanding of Able?

  3. Context: The Way to Rainy Mountain contains several accounts of Kiowa history from both a native and a non-native perspective, some of which are offered without much interpretation. Why might Momaday allow these stories to float and flow like this?

  4. Exploration: How do Momaday's works, and Native American works in general, seem to fit this unit? How does Momaday represent local cultures and ethnic differences in his writing? Make a list of ways in which Native American cultural concerns are similar to and different from those of African Americans and Jewish Americans.




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