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3. Utopian Promise   



11. Modernist Portraits

•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Problem-Based Learning Projects

""How can I get my students to think?" is a question asked by many faculty, regardless of their disciplines. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional method that challenges students to "learn to learn," working cooperatively in groups to seek solutions to real world problems. These problems are used to engage students' curiosity and initiate learning the subject matter. PBL prepares students to think critically and analytically, and to find and use appropriate learning resources." -- Barbara Duch, University of Delaware

  1. You belong to a group in which the members call themselves "Modernists." It includes Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Nella Larsen, and Susan Glaspell. Design a salon where you will hold your meetings. What works of art, music, and literature would you want around you? Whom would you invite to join you?

  2. You are an editor of children's books at a large publishing house, and you have been asked to put together a book on modernism for three age groups: ages 7-10, 11-13, and 14-17. How will you present modernism to each of these groups? What works will you use to explain the ideas behind modernism to them? How will you alter your presentation for different age groups?

  3. You are a member of the team responsible for designing an interdisciplinary exhibition about modernity and the 1920s and 1930s at a local museum. What art works, literary texts, film clips, music, photographs, and everyday objects would you include in this exhibition? What do you hope visitors to your exhibit will learn from your installation?



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