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3. Utopian Promise   



11. Modernist Portraits

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Activities: Author Activities


Hart Crane - Selected Archive Items

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[6287] Frank Pearsall, Walt Whitman, half-length portrait, seated, facing left, left hand under chin (1869),
courtesy of the Library of Congress [LC-USZ62-89947].
Modernist poet Hart Crane considered himself an artist in Whitman's tradition of optimism and exuberance. Both tried to represent the vastness of America in life and modernity.

[6548] A. E. Marey, Going to See Chaplin (1920),
courtesy of the Gazette du Bon Ton.
Line outside theater in Paris. Technology made movies available to mass audiences and facilitated popular culture, which often crossed national boundaries. Hart Crane's poem "Chaplinesque" referenced Charlie Chaplin, a popular comic actor.

[7194] Samuel H. Gottscho, New York City Views. Financial District, framed by Brooklyn Bridge,
courtesy of the Library of Congress [LC-G612-T01-21249].
Hart Crane used the Brooklyn Bridge to represent modernization's unifying potential, while some authors perceived technology and urbanization to be fragmenting.

[7656] Anonymous, Charlie Chaplin in The Vagabond (1916),
courtesy of the Library of Congress [LC-USZC4-6636].
In his poem "Chaplinesque," Hart Crane explored Chaplin's comic grace.



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