Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

Monthly Update sign up
Mailing List signup
Search
Follow The Annenberg Learner on LinkedIn Follow The Annenberg Learner on Facebook Follow Annenberg Learner on Twitter
MENU
American Passages: A Literary SurveyUnit IndexAmerican Passages Home
Home About Unit Index Archive Book Club Site Search
3. Utopian Promise   



11. Modernist Portraits

•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Author Activities


Hart Crane - Teaching Tips

Back Back to Hart Crane Activities
  • The Bridge could be fruitfully paired with Whitman's Song of Myself or "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry," as both poets aim to encompass and represent all aspects of America and American life. Ask students to find parallels in imagery, structure, and ideology between Crane's and Whitman's poems. Ask them to consider the difference between the symbol of the bridge as that which links times and places together as opposed to Whitman's use of himself as the connector of people from different times and places.

  • Because Crane uses visual references as touchstones for his poems, you might want to make your class's study of his work multi-media. The archive provides an image of the Brooklyn Bridge, which was constructed in the 1880s, when it was an engineering feat that surpassed all previous bridge construction and joined two of the most populous cities in the world. Consider presenting this information to extend your students' thinking about Crane's choice of the bridge as a symbol. Also ask them to consider the form of the Brooklyn Bridge, which, despite its modern construction, employs an almost medieval architectural vocabulary. You might also show a clip from a Charlie Chaplin film in conjunction with Crane's "Chaplinesque" and ask some of the same questions--what is it about this icon of silent film that appeals to Crane? How might Chaplin's body movements and the plots he involves himself in be attractive as a subject for poetry?




Slideshow Tool
This tool builds multimedia presentations for classrooms or assignments. Go

Archive
An online collection of 3000 artifacts for classroom use. Go

Download PDF
Download the Instructor Guide PDF for this Unit. Go

© Annenberg Foundation 2014. All rights reserved. Legal Policy