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3. Utopian Promise   



10. Rhythms
in Poetry


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Activities: Author Activities


Ezra Pound - Selected Archive Items

Back Back to Ezra Pound Activities

[4006] Ernest Hemingway, Letter, Ernest Hemingway to Archibald MacLeish discussing Ezra Pound's mental health and other literary matters, 10 August (1943),
courtesy of the Library of Congress, Archibald MacLeish Papers.
The year this letter was written Pound was indicted for treason against the United States. He was brought to trial but was found mentally unstable and sent to a psychiatric hospital.

[4981] Alvin Langdon Coburn, Portrait of Ezra Pound (n.d.),
courtesy of Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale Collection of American Literature, and New Directions Publishing Corp.
An influential poet himself, Ezra Pound also supported other writers. He was deeply interested in Chinese and Japanese poetry, and his own work stressed economy and precision.

[4985] Olga Rudge, Ezra Pound with Gargoyles at Provence (1923),
courtesy of Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale Collection of American Literature and New Directions Publishing Corp.
Ezra Pound was born in Idaho but spent most of his life in Europe. Pound was charged with treason for broadcasting fascist propaganda to the United States during World War II, but the charges were dropped due to the efforts of a number of his fellow poets.

[4997] Janet Flanner-Solita Solano, Group Portrait of American and European Artists and Performers in Paris (1920),
courtesy of the Library of Congress, Janet Flanner-Solita Solano Collection [LC-USZ62-113902].
Photograph of American and European artists in Paris, including Man Ray, Ezra Pound, and Martha Dennison. Many expatriate artists found inspiration in Paris's traditions and less restrictive culture.

[4998] New York World-Telegram and Sun, Ezra Pound, Half-Length Portrait, Facing Front (1943),
courtesy of Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale Collection of American Literature and New Directions Publishing Corp.
In part because of the generosity he had shown them, many of Ezra Pound's contemporaries were very loyal to him. While imprisoned in a psychiatric hospital after being charged with treason against the United States, Pound wrote his Pisan Cantos and was awarded the Bollingen-Library of Congress Award.

[7119] Shoshan, Monkey Reaching for the Moon (c. 1910),
courtesy of the print collection of Connecticut College, New London.
Japanese print showing a monkey hanging from a tree. Asian art became increasingly popular in the early twentieth century. Many modernist poets used Japanese and Chinese themes.

[8945] Lisa M. Steinman, Interview: "Rhythms in Poetry" (2003),
courtesy of American Passages.
Professor of English and humanities Lisa M. Steinman discusses Ezra Pound.



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