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American Passages: A Literary SurveyUnit IndexAmerican Passages Home
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3. Utopian Promise   



9. Social
Realism


•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Author Activities


Henry Adams - Selected Archive Items

Back Back to Henry Adams Activities

[7482] Irving Underhill, Bankers Trust & Stock Exchange Buildings (1912),
courtesy of the Library of Congress [LC-USZ62- 126718].
During the aptly named "Gilded Age," the richest 1 percent of households held more than 45 percent of the total national wealth, a percent unequaled to this day, although the past twenty years have seen a greater overall widening of the gap between the richest and poorest people in the United States.

[7659] Anonymous, Henry Adams Portrait (1912),
courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [LC-USZ62-116560].
Adams maintained a lifelong interest in politics and moved in powerful social circles in Washington, DC. He found his true calling, however, as a writer and a historian.

[7663] J. Alexander, Cookie's Row, Villa No. 3 (1968),
courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [HABS, DC,GEO,105-,DLC/PP-00: DC-2].
Photograph of the entryway and front room of a mansion on Cookie's Row in Washington, DC. This is an example of the formal Victorian mansions occupied by wealthy residents of the nation's capital at the turn of the twentieth century.

[7664] Anonymous, Potomac Aqueduct ca. 1865,
courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [HABS,DC,GEO,1-14].
Photograph of two men talking beside the Potomac River, with the Potomac Aqueduct in the distance. The aqueduct bridge allowed canal boats to travel to Alexandria without having to unload their cargo onto ships to cross the Potomac. It was one of America's earliest engineering triumphs.



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