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3. Utopian Promise   



3. Gothic Undercurrents

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Activities: Author Activities


Emily Dickinson - Selected Archive Items

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[1617] Anonymous, Emily Dickinson (n.d.),
courtesy of Amherst College Library.
Portrait of Dickinson sitting at table. Until recently, this was the only known image of Dickinson, a notorious recluse who rarely left her lifelong residence in Amherst, Massachusetts.

[2390] Anonymous, Emily Dickinson (n.d.),
courtesy of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Recently discovered photo of Dickinson. Dickinson is often considered the first modernist poet, despite the fact that she wrote most of her poetry decades before the movement began.

[8659] Priscilla Wald, "Dickinson Reading" (2001),
courtesy of Annenberg Media.
Wald, associate professor of English at Duke University, reads Dickinson's "Tell all the truth but tell it slant."

[8662] Priscilla Wald, "Dickinson Reading" (2001),
courtesy of Annenberg Media.
Wald, associate professor of English at Duke University, reads Dickinson's "I heard a fly buzz."

[9011] Johnson, "The Yellow Rose of Texas" (n.d.),
courtesy of the Library of Congress, American Memory Collection [CW106920].
The first known copy of the lyrics are dated 1836, around the time of the battle of Santa Ana in Texas. The song is credited to a black soldier; the "yellow rose" is most likely an endearing name for a mulatta woman named Emily West. "Yellow" was a common term for light-skinned mulattos, and women were often referred to as roses or flowers in popular music of the time.

[9016] John Newton, "Amazing Grace" lyrics (c. 1760-70).
One of the most popular hymns in the English language, the words were written by English pastor John Newton, himself a "saved heathen." Newton was a vagrant, indentured servant, petty criminal, and slave trader before his religious epiphany.



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