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American Passages: A Literary SurveyUnit IndexAmerican Passages Home
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3. Utopian Promise   



3. Utopian
Promise


•  Unit Overview
•  Using the Video
•  Authors
•  Timeline
•  Activities
- Overview Questions
- Video
Activities
- Author
Activities
- Context
Activities
- Creative Response
- PBL Projects

Activities: Creative Response

  1. Journal: Try to imagine how one of Mary Rowlandson's Narra-gansett or Wampanoag captors would have experienced the events that she describes during her captivity. Remember that the Indians were provoked by the Plymouth colony's decision to execute members of the Wampanoag tribe, as well as by longstanding tensions with European settlers over land rights. By the late seventeenth century, many Native Americans in the New England region were suffering from disease and starvation as European settlers encroached upon their traditional homes and hunting grounds. Given this background information, write a short narrative of the conflict at Lancaster, the capture of Mrs. Rowlandson, and the subsequent journey into the wilderness from the point of view of a Native American.

  2. Poet's Corner: Read Anne Bradstreet's "In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet" and Edward Taylor's "Upon Wedlock, and Death of Children." Make a list of the images and metaphors the poets employ to characterize their familial relationships. How do Bradstreet and Taylor employ similar images to different ends? Draw upon Bradstreet's and Taylor's metaphors and images to write your own poem. Write about what these images signify to you personally; your poem need not be about family, religion, or God.

  3. Multimedia: Imagine that you have embarked on a journey through colonial America. Explain the nature of your journey (you might be a traveling missionary, like John Woolman or Samson Occom; you could be a captive, like Mary Rowlandson; or you might be on a business trip, like Sarah Kemble Knight). Using the American Passages archive and slide-show software, create a multimedia photo album of the highlights of your journey. Include captions that explain and interpret your experience for a modern audience.



Slideshow Tool
This tool builds multimedia presentations for classrooms or assignments. Go

Archive
An online collection of 3000 artifacts for classroom use. Go

Download PDF
Download the Instructor Guide PDF for this Unit. Go

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